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Curious about pet weevils?


Wolfman
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I adore these creatures, but it seems rather hard to find information about keeping them/breeding them. Anyone have any clues about possible breeders or keeping them as pets? 

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I haven't really heard anyone in the States keeping weevils as pet, but I know cases in Japan and elsewhere in Asian countries keeping some jewel weevils (Eupholus spp.) as pet.

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On 1/29/2022 at 3:34 PM, JKim said:

I haven't really heard anyone in the States keeping weevils as pet, but I know cases in Japan and elsewhere in Asian countries keeping some jewel weevils (Eupholus spp.) as pet.

Were they successful in breeding Eupholus?  It's my understanding that (as is the case with most weevils) this genus is host plant specific (e.g. Selaginella spp.).

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On 1/29/2022 at 6:22 PM, Goliathus said:

Were they successful in breeding Eupholus?  It's my understanding that (as is the case with most weevils) this genus is host plant specific (e.g. Selaginella spp.).

Actually, I'm not sure. I saw some random posts on Instagram while browsing through feeds.

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People do keep bean weevils and flour weevils for live food which i always found pretty cool but as someone said before me, most weevil species need a living host plant which is hard if not impossible to do in captivity

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At the (sadly now closed) Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium in New Orleans, they used to house Macrochirus praetor.  I was lucky enough to go there several years ago, and yes, they did have those weevils on display when I was there.  They were happily feeding on beetle jelly!  As for pets, you won't be able to legally keep them in the USA.  But yes, check out the photos:  http://www.theonlinezoo.com/pages/malaysian_weevil.html

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On 1/31/2022 at 4:30 PM, Acro said:

At the (sadly now closed) Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium in New Orleans, they used to house Macrochirus praetor.  I was lucky enough to go there several years ago, and yes, they did have those weevils on display when I was there.  They were happily feeding on beetle jelly!  As for pets, you won't be able to legally keep them in the USA.  But yes, check out the photos:  http://www.theonlinezoo.com/pages/malaysian_weevil.html


I wasn't aware that the Audubon Insectarium had permanently closed - that's really unfortunate.

M. praetor is a truly remarkable species - the largest member of the Curculionidae!  There are also some very impressive, large species in the genus Cyrtotrachelus, such as C. longimanus - 

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and C. buqueti - 

C0rG2ZTUUAAC8fp?format=jpg&name=4096x409

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On 1/31/2022 at 5:30 PM, Acro said:

At the (sadly now closed) Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium in New Orleans, they used to house Macrochirus praetor.  I was lucky enough to go there several years ago, and yes, they did have those weevils on display when I was there.  They were happily feeding on beetle jelly!  As for pets, you won't be able to legally keep them in the USA.  But yes, check out the photos:  http://www.theonlinezoo.com/pages/malaysian_weevil.html

Wow... I had no idea they closed. I visited there just couple years ago. They must have been taking steps to close at the time then...

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On 1/31/2022 at 10:57 PM, Goliathus said:


I wasn't aware that the Audubon Insectarium had permanently closed - that's really unfortunate.

M. praetor is a truly remarkable species - the largest member of the Curculionidae!  There are also some very impressive, large species in the genus Cyrtotrachelus, such as C. longimanus - 

DyAB1H0VsAAw_0k?format=jpg&name=large

and C. buqueti - 

C0rG2ZTUUAAC8fp?format=jpg&name=4096x409

It says on google that they are temporarily closed because they are moving to a new location. So not permanently closed :) 

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June 2015: Iridopelma Bark Assassin Bug, Greater Cleveland Aquarium, Indonesian Assassin Mimic Cockroach, Featured giant Palmetto Weevil

Short article in invert mag but just eggs and hatchlings

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/30/2022 at 11:55 AM, Moose said:

People do keep bean weevils and flour weevils for live food which i always found pretty cool but as someone said before me, most weevil species need a living host plant which is hard if not impossible to do in captivity

What is the scientific name for the Bean Weevils?  I've only found Callosobruchus maculatus and Acanthoscelides obtectus, but it seems that neither of those are actual weevils. 

Do you know the name of the Flour Weevils?  I've only found Grain Weevils: Sitophilus granarius  (found only 1 source for these) and Rice Weevils: Sitophilus oryzae (haven't found a source for these).

On 2/1/2022 at 7:36 AM, BensBeasts1 said:

Acorn weevils are pretty easy to breed.

What's their scientific name?  Are you currently breeding them?  :)

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Conotrachelus posticatus is the scientific name, I haven’t bred them before but I know multiple people on discord that had easily bred them using acorns.

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On 2/14/2022 at 10:52 PM, BensBeasts1 said:

Conotrachelus posticatus is the scientific name, I haven’t bred them before but I know multiple people on discord that had easily bred them using acorns.

I'd love it if you could compile some care info from that.  :):):)  ;)

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On 2/14/2022 at 4:16 PM, Acro said:

I've only found Grain Weevils: Sitophilus granarius  (found only 1 source for these) and Rice Weevils: Sitophilus oryzae (haven't found a source for these).

Roach Crossing and Will's Bug Room have S.oryzae. 🙂 I'd be curious to know the source you've found for S.granarius. They're the only species of Sitophilus I might be interested in since they can't fly.

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  • 1 month later...
On 1/31/2022 at 8:57 PM, Goliathus said:


I wasn't aware that the Audubon Insectarium had permanently closed - that's really unfortunate.

M. praetor is a truly remarkable species - the largest member of the Curculionidae!  There are also some very impressive, large species in the genus Cyrtotrachelus, such as C. longimanus - 

DyAB1H0VsAAw_0k?format=jpg&name=large

and C. buqueti - 

C0rG2ZTUUAAC8fp?format=jpg&name=4096x409

Brr...I have trouble holding small weevils due to their incredible claws, I can't imagine trying to get one of these specimens off one's hands...

Thanks,

Arthroverts

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have bean weevils, Callosobruchus maculatus for a feeder colony for some smaller assassins. As for weevils as pets, I have actually kept the larger asian bamboo weevils when I resided in China, and they adults feed on jelly fine, oviposition was difficult though, so I gave up after a few tries. Adults lives an impressive amount of time. There are some very impressive and beautiful weevil in Florida, if you really want to try this family, check them out! 

And don't forget, bark beetles are also weevils! They are commonly cultured in labs, semi-social, and make beautiful wood galleries. They have an incredible diversity and some species are quite long lived. Plus - they are active right this moment statewide.

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