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Mystery grub crawling gifs


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I do not know the species of this grub, since I just found him on an off chance while out gathering substrate material. I want to say he is now L3 since he's a lot bigger than when I first got him but I didn't find him tiny, and he's doing well on the mix I have given so I assume it's a rhino/ox of some sort. Anyway! I made these gifs to explain to a friend how they crawl along their backs when she asked how they got around with those giant butts and tiny legs.

 

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Also some bonus fresh hatched D tityus! The poor pale guy hatched deformed but I have high hopes for the others.

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I wish I could, but all I have is a poopy cellphone camera that detests taking photos of small things. The best photo I got of him last night was this:

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Not really ID worthy. All the other ones came out too dark, too blurry, or more often too amorphous blob. It'll have to wait until I get a camera with a macro setting

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I agree with Lucanus, here in NC we have plenty of Cotinis during mid-spring late summer and I find about 10-20 larvae a day at the tennis courts that I play at they are always crawling on their backs whenever a rainy day has occurred (washed up) and typically never see any other larvae move in that manner.

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I don't think we get D. granti here either, though I do believe we get D.tityus this far north but this definetly isn't D. tityus. The head would have to be a lot darker, I think. This state is huge with lots of different ecosystems, but we are very south and not terribly west. We get lots of crisscrossing territories but I don't think there's solid coverage for anything.

 

If it is a flower, I'm going to need to give it a lot more wood, so that is good to know. I wasn't aware only particular beetle types moved along their back. I thought it was a more common form of locomotion. Also good to know!

 

This guy isn't a recent find, I came across him in... November I believe?

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