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D. tityus hibernation?


jreidsma
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Hi,

(I have first instar larva, hatchlings pretty much so it will be a while before I worry about this)

 

I read online and heard on here that D. tityus have a hibernation cycle, and it can increase their life span. How does this happen in captivity? Do I need to do anything special? Or is it optional with no ill effects?

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That is true. For mine it lasted around 4 months which I think is an average time. I'm pretty sure it increases their lifespan and also increases the chances of more ova production. Mine stayed completely buried under the substrate and didn't really move much. They won't eat or breed or really even surface much. Nothing special really just try not to disturb them much. It is a natural pattern but if you were to raise the temperatures it should make them come out of it faster since it will seem like the warmer months. The ill effects could be less ova and a shortened life.

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That is true. For mine it lasted around 4 months which I think is an average time. I'm pretty sure it increases their lifespan and also increases the chances of more ova production. Mine stayed completely buried under the substrate and didn't really move much. They won't eat or breed or really even surface much. Nothing special really just try not to disturb them much. It is a natural pattern but if you were to raise the temperatures it should make them come out of it faster since it will seem like the warmer months. The ill effects could be less ova and a shortened life.

 

Does the temperature have to be lowered for them to hibernate? Or will they do it regardless, even if it is 80 degrees?

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Does the temperature have to be lowered for them to hibernate? Or will they do it regardless, even if it is 80 degrees?

They can hibernate as warm as 72F. If you keep freshly eclosed adults at 80F they'll either come out very early or fall over dead. How important the hibernation period is depends also on the stock. Different areas have different weather and I've noticed the ones that have been in captivity for many generations become less likely to benefit from it. No matter what, cutting out the hibernation period shortens the adult life but not necessarily the active period.

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I will check the temps in all the rooms of my house.

 

So keep the larva in my room where it is warm until they get decent sized or L3, put them somewhere cooler while they pupate and for four months after they hatch? Then take them out and put them in my room and the warmer temps will make them come out of the ground?

 

So about once a week or so (give a week or so maybe) check on them and see what stage they are at? Like pupal cell/pupa, or still larva.

 

D. granti don't do this right? Just want to make sure as I have both.

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You don't want to warm up D.granti too much, too soon either but that species dies rapidly either way. You have a lot of time with tityus. This depends too on when they eclose relative to when you notice.

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So the granti could just stay in my room without the need for a hibernation.

 

I have quite a while to figure this out. I have three granti eggs and 5 tiny tityus L1 or so.

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