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Tom
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I am a subscriber and always look forward to every new issue. However, that's not why I am writing. I am an avid reptile collector and I recently had a cb dusky pigmy rattlesnake die after 6 years of raising him. I found him late and put him in a ziplock bag for future disposal. The next day I discovered a beetle in the bag with him. My natural assumption is that he came in contact with a larva or eggs and this insect was the cause of his demise. I euthanized the beetle and kept it for identification. Would someone be interested in attempting identification if I sent some pictures. I could send the beetle if necessary. I have a large herp collection as I am the reptile specialist for a local wild animal park and I use them for shows and lectures. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thank you in advance,

Tom

 

PS. first time posting ANYTHING, so I hope the pics downloaded correctly

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It's a carrion or burying beetle in the genus Nicrophorus, maybe N. tomentosus. Members of this genus are attracted to small dead animals like snakes and mice that they bury, eat and feed to their larvae.

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I am a subscriber and always look forward to every new issue. However, that's not why I am writing. I am an avid reptile collector and I recently had a cb dusky pigmy rattlesnake die after 6 years of raising him. I found him late and put him in a ziplock bag for future disposal. The next day I discovered a beetle in the bag with him. My natural assumption is that he came in contact with a larva or eggs and this insect was the cause of his demise. I euthanized the beetle and kept it for identification. Would someone be interested in attempting identification if I sent some pictures. I could send the beetle if necessary. I have a large herp collection as I am the reptile specialist for a local wild animal park and I use them for shows and lectures. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thank you in advance,

Tom

 

PS. first time posting ANYTHING, so I hope the pics downloaded correctly

 

Looks like a hairy burying beetle. Similiar in appearance to the American Burying Beetle that is endangered. Parents use thier legs to conveyor-belt small dead animals to a safe location to bury their salvage and then lay their eggs on it.

 

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