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license in the US?


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Hello, I have been researching because I am planning on getting a Dynastes Hurcules Beetle and I can't really seem to find anything about if I need a license and I really want to make sure because I believe with some beetles you do. Please tell me if anyone knows if you need a license in the US to own. I'm not planning on breeding.

 

This is my first post on this forum so forgive me.

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Yes, you'd need permits to keep this species, which are notoriously hard to get, unless you are using the beetles for research at a university.

 

Basically, the only way you'd be able to keep this species in the states is by doing it illegally, at least that's the case for most people.

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Hopefully this changes soon though. This species needs really decayed wood to even reproduce in; females can't enter harder wood like long-horned beetles could. Long-horned beetles are the real problem that USDA/APHIS should be worrying about, not most Dynastinae. Tell me this, do you really think a larvae of this species could survive outside in the cold winter months in the east coast? They live in a warm climate and there's no way adults could reproduce under harsh conditions. Even if USDA/APHIS thinks you were to release them outside because you got sick of keeping them, that's unrealistic. If a hobbyist is going to pay a HUGE sum of money to keep something he/she finds amazing, why would they just get rid of it like that? Major live pairs could go up to 550 USD. If anything, they should limit the keeping of this species to Florida which almost anything could survive. And yes, we all know the coconut rhinoceros beetle is a problem but that's just one particular species. Dynastes hercules hercules does not pose a threat to the environment in my opinion.

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Hopefully this changes soon though. This species needs really decayed wood to even reproduce in; females can't enter harder wood like long-horned beetles could. Long-horned beetles are the real problem that USDA/APHIS should be worrying about, not most Dynastinae. Tell me this, do you really think a larvae of this species could survive outside in the cold winter months in the east coast? They live in a warm climate and there's no way adults could reproduce under harsh conditions. Even if USDA/APHIS thinks you were to release them outside because you got sick of keeping them, that's unrealistic. If a hobbyist is going to pay a HUGE sum of money to keep something he/she finds amazing, why would they just get rid of it like that? Major live pairs could go up to 550 USD. If anything, they should limit the keeping of this species to Florida which almost anything could survive. And yes, we all know the coconut rhinoceros beetle is a problem but that's just one particular species. Dynastes hercules hercules does not pose a threat to the environment in my opinion.

 

 

Nicely said!!!

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