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Goliathus

Chrysina woodi

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A captive-bred, Blue-legged Jewel Scarab (Chrysina woodi) that emerged several days ago - the first live example of the species that I've ever seen in person.  This species is from the mountains of far West TX.  I didn't expect that I would have any adults emerging this soon - was thinking that they would probably wait until perhaps July / August.  Quite different looking from C. beyeri - it has its own distinct shade of iridescent green, and a different color scheme, with its bright gold legs and metallic blue tarsi.  There is also a band of gold along the margins of the elytra.  Its natural host tree is a species of wild black walnut (Juglans microcarpa).

woodi_02.jpg

woodi_01.jpg

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That is absolutely gorgeous. It's a shame Chrysina spp are so short-lived as adults.

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1 hour ago, PowerHobo said:

That is absolutely gorgeous. It's a shame Chrysina spp are so short-lived as adults.

Shorter-lived than most rhino and stag beetles, yes - but I've actually been quite surprised at how long I've had Chrysina adults live; up to 9 weeks in some cases (for captive-bred gloriosa, at least).  I've also had some beyeri live for quite a while.  More typically though, 6 to 8 weeks.  But, that's more than enough time for them to lay plenty of eggs, and fortunately, even one Chrysina female can lay many eggs.  Like most beetles of the desert southwest, the life cycle of Chrysina is strongly tied to the summer monsoon season.  In captivity however, they often emerge out of sync with that, since I keep them under rather constant environmental conditions that don't include seasonal temperature and moisture changes.  Typically, I keep them between 68 (winter) and 76 F (summer).  Probably more important than the temperature though, are the substrate conditions needed for successful pupation.

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2 hours ago, Goliathus said:

Shorter-lived than most rhino and stag beetles, yes - but I've actually been quite surprised at how long I've had Chrysina adults live; up to 9 weeks in some cases (for captive-bred gloriosa, at least).  I've also had some beyeri live for quite a while.  More typically though, 6 to 8 weeks.  But, that's more than enough time for them to lay plenty of eggs, and fortunately, even one Chrysina female can lay many eggs.  Like most beetles of the desert southwest, the life cycle of Chrysina is strongly tied to the summer monsoon season.  In captivity however, they often emerge out of sync with that, since I keep them under rather constant environmental conditions that don't include seasonal temperature and moisture changes.  Typically, I keep them between 68 (winter) and 76 F (summer).  Probably more important than the temperature though, are the substrate conditions needed for successful pupation.

They're somewhat dependent on clay sub for pupal cell creation, right?

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3 hours ago, PowerHobo said:

They're somewhat dependent on clay sub for pupal cell creation, right?

Yes, see the following post - 

 

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