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List of Goliathus species


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On 7/30/2021 at 2:18 PM, Ratmosphere said:

Very helpful. I want em all lol.

Most of these are forms, rather than species.  By the way, G. albosignatus albosignatus and G. orientalis undulatus have been left out.  As for G. goliatus - in the words of entomologist Gilbert Lachaume (1983), some coleopterists have "amused themselves by naming a large number of varieties".  I can't even recall all of the G. goliatus forms that I've seen listed on sites such as eBay over the years, many of which are not actually "officially recognized", and seem to have been coined by sellers.  I believe that one such example, is hieroglyphicus

G_g_hieroglyphicus_male.jpg

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Exactly, Goliathus, I've seen plenty of "forms" listed on eBay as well, that's not even a subspecies, just a variation, like the spring and summer

"forms" of Actias luna . Clearly a lot of individual variation within the genus.

It'd be cheaper and easier just to make a poster out of that picture.. a 2D collection.

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On 7/30/2021 at 4:57 PM, kevink said:

Exactly, Goliathus, I've seen plenty of "forms" listed on eBay as well, that's not even a subspecies, just a variation, like the spring and summer

"forms" of Actias luna . Clearly a lot of individual variation within the genus.

It'd be cheaper and easier just to make a poster out of that picture.. a 2D collection.

In isopods and reptiles they are called morphs. so forms are just variations? Also the Regius goliathus hybrid Bred by insect brothers would in theory create a new species?

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On 7/31/2021 at 12:03 PM, Teneb said:

In isopods and reptiles they are called morphs. so forms are just variations? Also the Regius goliathus hybrid Bred by insect brothers would in theory create a new species?

In isopods and reptiles they are called morphs. so forms are just variations?

Morph, form, and variation are all essentially interchangeable terms.

Also the Regius goliathus hybrid Bred by insect brothers would in theory create a new species?

No - it's a hybrid, in the same way that a cross between a lion and tiger, or a horse and donkey, are also hybrids.  Hybrids can be fertile or infertile, depending on genetics.  Incidentally, it's still not yet been truly established whether Goliathus "atlas" is indeed a hybrid between regius and cacicus, or simply a rare form that occasionally turns up within the regius gene pool.  There are at least two (or more) rare forms of regius that look quite similar to atlas, but are not the true atlas, which is distinguishable from the others by a particular detail of the dark band that runs along the inner elytral margins (elytral suture).

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On 7/31/2021 at 11:21 AM, Goliathus said:

In isopods and reptiles they are called morphs. so forms are just variations?

Morph, form, and variation are all essentially interchangeable terms.

Also the Regius goliathus hybrid Bred by insect brothers would in theory create a new species?

No - it's a hybrid, in the same way that a cross between a lion and tiger, or a horse and donkey, are also hybrids.  Hybrids can be fertile or infertile, depending on genetics.  Incidentally, it's still not yet been truly established whether Goliathus "atlas" is indeed a hybrid between regius and cacicus, or simply a rare form that occasionally turns up within the regius gene pool.  There are at least two (or more) rare forms of regius that look quite similar to atlas, but are not the true atlas, which is distinguishable from the others by a particular detail of the dark band that runs along the inner elytral margins (elytral suture).

Oh ok, got that!

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@Teneb
The hybridization done by Lucas of Insect Brothers is considered a hybridization, not a valid species. That is why He stated as a hybrid, not came up with some names. To become a valid species, the name has to be published in scientific journal. When I said a valid species, that's what I mean: "Published Name."

G. atlas is a published name, so it is a valid name. However, normally, a hybridization between two (or more, if there is any) species are not given a name since it is rarely researched to be published because no one know whether it really is a hybridization between different species or just a variation, just like how the member @Goliathus has mentioned. That is why hybridization is usually referred as  A x B.

If Lucas of Insect Brothers, just randomly came up with a name like Goliathus insectbrotherus for that hybridization, then that's invalid name, since such name has never been published 😂😂.

A most recent study I was able to locate for the status of Goliathus (with barcoding) is a work done by De Palma et al. 2020. Here is a link to the research just in case anyone is interested: https://www.entomoafricana.org/ent afr 2020 25 1 De palma et al goliathus b.pdf

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