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Chrysina pupation question


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Hey, I would hate to resurrect a dead thread (I don't think we're there quite yet?... It hasn't been ridiculously long), but I have to ask. Where has everyone been getting the clay they use for their successful pupation? Do you guys buy it? Or do you go collect it from somewhere? Also, how long (in your experience) has their diapause taken? I've had some that are in cells they constructed, and they're clearly alive and look like healthy L3 grubs shortly before pupation, but it's been pushing six months now that some of them have been in the pupal cells. Are they gone? Or is this still within the range or normal diapause?

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49 minutes ago, QuissettHouse said:

Hey, I would hate to resurrect a dead thread (I don't think we're there quite yet?... It hasn't been ridiculously long), but I have to ask. Where has everyone been getting the clay they use for their successful pupation? Do you guys buy it? Or do you go collect it from somewhere? Also, how long (in your experience) has their diapause taken? I've had some that are in cells they constructed, and they're clearly alive and look like healthy L3 grubs shortly before pupation, but it's been pushing six months now that some of them have been in the pupal cells. Are they gone? Or is this still within the range or normal diapause?

Yes - Chrysina tend to have a very long larval diapause after making their cells - well over half a year.  Following this, the actual pre-pupal and pupal stages aren't particularly long. 

What species are you working with?

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I’m working with both beyeri and woodii. I’ve run out of the sandy/clay soil mix and my woodii are going to be pupating soon, so I wanted to know if there was an online source. But the beyeri are the ones pupating now, and still in diapause

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Thanks for the link. I would assume that's the BIC affiliate link, so I'll buy some from there. I also saw that the Insect Brothers have their own clay substrate so I'll likely buy some of that as well, just to have plenty for the future. Thank you

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On 1/25/2021 at 10:06 PM, Yellowfin2na said:

I am in Texas and we have clay soil. I used the clay from my back yard and it is working fine. I made sure to dig down over a foot so in an area that I know hasn't been exposed to pesticides. 

 

So far it looks like all of my larva except two are in chambers finally.

That makes sense. Where I live we have no clay soil whatsoever so I’m doomed to order it online, but I’ve discovered that mixing well washed sand and soil together has actually worked super well. My beyeri pupated in that just fine. Unfortunately I’m not in a position to make more right at this moment so I bought some off of Insect Brothers

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  • 3 months later...
5 hours ago, the_cream_man said:

@Goliathus

When these finish pupating will they climb out of the soil on their own or should/could I dig them out?

I looked in and it seems like at least one emerged from it's pupal cell, the others I don't have a window in to see though :c

Yes, the adults will emerge on their own, once they are fully hardened and become active.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I might be running into similar issues with Lucanus Elaphus.  I didn't fill the containers to the top. They do not come to the top anymore.  They been under the clay for about 1.5 months. But hasn't make cells. Looks like they are getting close to pupate in the tunnel.  They are yellow, moving slow and takes characteristics of a pupa's movement.  What should i do at this point?  Take them out and start over? Leave it in the tunnel or wait for it to be prepupa and made an artificial cell?

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29 minutes ago, Fire Moth said:

What should i do at this point?

Nothing would be my recommendation. There's no reason to assume there's anything wrong, it sounds, though I've never heard of needing a clay layer for stags(?)... I've always just used flake soil and chunks of wood for the few that I've raised. I would defer to anyone with more experience, but I'd say just leave them be

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First time with any beetles.  I am rearing along with my goliathus.  In my Lucanus Elaphus group one thats in a bigger container with deeper clay has already been a pupa for 13 days.  The others are just lagging behind.  Wonder if they doesn't like the setup.

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All of my 9 Lucanus Elaphus larvae have been in their pupal cells for over 6 months now. Leave your larvae where they are. No need to take them out. If they dislike the condition they will come out of the soil.

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Thanks Oak. I can sleep well now 🤠

2 minutes ago, Oak said:

All of my 9 Lucanus Elaphus larvae have been in their pupal cells for over 6 months now. Leave your larvae where they are. No need to take them out. If they dislike the condition they will come out of the soil.

 

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That was my assessment of the situation as well, thank you for weighing in Oak. Out of curiosity, have you ever used clay for them? Also Fire Moth my understanding is that you're almost always better off leaving the grubs in their cells, unless there's a real issue, you shouldn't take them out for an artificial one. Especially before they pupate, then you risk disturbing them to where they never pupate

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4 minutes ago, QuissettHouse said:

That was my assessment of the situation as well, thank you for weighing in Oak. Out of curiosity, have you ever used clay for them? Also Fire Moth my understanding is that you're almost always better off leaving the grubs in their cells, unless there's a real issue, you shouldn't take them out for an artificial one. Especially before they pupate, then you risk disturbing them to where they never pupate

My Lucanus elaphus larvae kept surfacing when there was only flake soil present but when I provided them a mix of sand/clay, they happily made their pupal cells. However I know that some people manage to get them to pupate without clay.

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7 hours ago, Oak said:

My Lucanus elaphus larvae kept surfacing when there was only flake soil present but when I provided them a mix of sand/clay, they happily made their pupal cells. However I know that some people manage to get them to pupate without clay.

I've had elaphus larvae build cells in both flake soil as well as clay, but in the wild, they definitely make earthen cells, rather than in the wood in which they develop.  I'm not sure what particular kind of soil composition is ideal for this species, though.  They might possibly prefer soil that is more sandy than clayey, or somewhere in between, so it's probably good that you mixed some sand and clay together.

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