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Found 5 results

  1. Hello everyone! I found this beetle in the grass in Bastrop, Texas. Can someone help me identify it? I think it’s maybe an Eastern Hercules or Grant beetle? What’s the difference? Thank you!
  2. I recently purchased The Complete Guide to Rearing the Eastern Hercules Beetle and Other Rhinoceros Beetles... however, I am not too satisfied with the quality of the book I received from Amazon. I am aware that there are more complete books out there, but I wanted a thinner book as I only plan on raising this one species of rhinoceros beetle for now and I wanted something I could carry to read and memorize while I was out. Anyway. The quality of the paperback book is... suspect. I am not sure if it is supposed to be this cheap feeling, but it feels as though someone made a photocopy of the original hardcover book and simply stapled it together. Most of the photos are black and white and poor quality. There is one set of color photos in the center, but the rest of the photos are somewhat pixelated and it makes it difficult to see details in some of the more important photos, such as the photos of the grub underbellies for sexing or colors for substrate reference. The font within is about size 11 or so and easy to read; no pixelation with that printing, thankfully. The book is 40 pages and I have noticed a few typos, but information is clear and it is not a difficult to understand text. The information inside is mostly what you can find here on these wonderful forums, so I will not detail all that unless specifically asked. However, I would say that if you are thinking about getting the book, get the "Ultimate" book and get it in hardcover. Your quality will likely be much better... and it will look much better on your shelf.
  3. So, I realized I think I may have had a male ox beetle live an unusually long time? I had a minor male emerge back in September (2019) of last year, which I recorded over on my Twitter so I'd know the exact time he was removed from the pupal cell. Today, I came home and found him suddenly dead. Internet says that the adults only live about 3-5 months and the care guide (Orin's) states they "regularly live five to eight months". So, if he came out as an adult in September 2019, that's about 11 months for mine. All he ate was fuji apples because that was his favorite fare; nothing special like pure maple syrup and honey like his parents got (which both lived to about six months). Is this unusual? It doesn't matter to me much, but I was curious if anyone else has had ox beetles live this long. I wanted to continue breeding but I didn't get a female to emerge at the right time and my only other pupa appeared to fail to finish growing it's "skin" when this one had originally pupated. Has anyone raised any S. antaeus who could give me some information?
  4. my first beetle larvaes arrived! there is also a female but i didnt get a photo of her. theyre eating very well.
  5. A couple of photos of a 69 mm male Dynastes tityus that emerged yesterday. This is the largest example of this species that I've ever produced. The largest specimen that I've ever heard of however, was 70.75 mm. I've maintained my tityus culture continuously since 2002, all descended from just one original pair, and they've shown no signs of problems despite being repeatedly inbred for 16 years, with no new genetic lines introduced. The male in the photos is one of several of comparable size that I've had emerge over the past few weeks. They took 2 years to go from egg to adult, and were reared on fermented oak sawdust.
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