Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Was very cool to witness this. Had the beer bottle to match! Love this species.

AF918F12-306D-4089-85AB-5E5B638922C1.thumb.jpeg.61e844b6b312d1ab3b5f688599d87744.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is that really Attacus atlas? Seems somewhat small... minor female?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very impressive - one of my favorite moths!  I'll always remember the first time I ever saw this species live, at a butterfly house.  Hoping to also eventually see a live Coscinocera hercules; another giant, that combines the size of Attacus atlas with the long hindwing tails of Actias luna:

Male - 

38fe63f490740e99f7af83610a6fad3e.jpg

Female - 

43712786821_48c4c5ec6e_b.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/26/2019 at 1:28 PM, Ratmosphere said:

Wow, I love that!

Argema mittrei (Madagascar Comet Moth) - that's another amazing giant saturniid with long tails - 

22cdec18d878af1e89610a1e994b9fb2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since it seems people are now just posting pictures of any large moth, here is my Argema mittrei specimen. I volunteer at a butterfly house, and I got to hold this one when it was alive. 

EF149278-9590-468B-816B-83FB8DE628B2.jpeg.f8607a8dbbf59f55e3fd3d6a0753f2a2.jpeg

PS. If you are wondering why it is pinned to a tree and not it a case, then I should mention that I took this on April Fools Day to upload to iNaturalist. Sadly, no identifiers came across it before the end of the day, so I deleted the observation to prevent any confusion. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, The Mantis Menagerie said:

Since it seems people are now just posting pictures of any large moth, here is my Argema mittrei specimen. I volunteer at a butterfly house, and I got to hold this one when it was alive.

PS. If you are wondering why it is pinned to a tree and not it a case, then I should mention that I took this on April Fools Day to upload to iNaturalist. Sadly, no identifiers came across it before the end of the day, so I deleted the observation to prevent any confusion. 

Was that specimen raised from a larva in the US, or did it simply emerge from an imported cocoon?  Just out of curiosity - if reared in the US, do you know what food plant was used?  I've heard that in captivity, this species has been kept on Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), as well as Eucalyptus gunnii, Pistacia spp.Rhus spp., Mimosa spp., and even Toxicodendron pubescens (Poison Oak).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Goliathus said:

Was that specimen raised from a larva in the US, or did it simply emerge from an imported cocoon?  Just out of curiosity - if reared in the US, do you know what food plant was used?  I've heard that in captivity, this species has been kept on Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), as well as Eucalyptus gunnii, Pistacia spp.Rhus spp., Mimosa spp., and even Toxicodendron pubescens (Poison Oak).

This was from an imported cocoon. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×