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To a layman, there are remarkable morphological and lifestyle similarities between Platerodrilus and Lamprigera. Yet the latter are Lampyrids! What is the phylogenetic relationship between these taxa?

 

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Is that... me...??

Neither I hold any PhD degree(s) nor I'm interested in that beetle groups at all, so I have no clue on details. But in general opinion by looking at the taxon, Genus Platerodrilus (Lycidae) and Genus Lamprigera (Lampryridae) share same Superfamily of Elateroidea. Probably that is why they look similar (and obviously that can be a reason that they fall into same superfamily).

Order: Coleoptera
Suborder: Polyphaga
Superfamily: Elateroidea
Family: Lycidae and Lampyridae.

You know how taxonomy is like, right? Based on how closely related morphologically, they fall into same or close categories (taxons), like how rhinoceros beetles (Subfamily Dynastinae) falls into Family Scarabaeidae with many other Subfamilies (Rutelinae, Scarabaeinae, Aphodiinae, Euchirinae, Cetoniinae, etc.) They all have very similar larval morphology: C-shaped, white body, six legs present, reddish brown to black spiracles present laterally, reddish brown to black head capsule, vertically opening anus, etc. Of course, larval morphology is not what insect taxonomy is based on, as it is only based on morphology of adult insects.

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Thanks! To the taxonomically naive - like me - it seemed the two genera would be more closely linked than mere occupants of the same superfamily. However, your note that larval similarity must always take a taxonomic back seat to adult form is very appropriate.

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