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Well guys, in a couple days Im heading to the port lovaka area of Texas (i think mid-east Texas or something like that). Im not totally sure what to expect in terms of insects, though Im hoping for G. Caseyi and glowspot click beetles. If anyone has any advice on what to look for, what sorts of traps/techniques to use, etc. please let me know. If youre looking for certain insects from that area, also let me know.

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Well guys, in a couple days Im heading to the port lovaka area of Texas (i think mid-east Texas or something like that). Im not totally sure what to expect in terms of insects, though Im hoping for G. Caseyi and glowspot click beetles. If anyone has any advice on what to look for, what sorts of traps/techniques to use, etc. please let me know. If youre looking for certain insects from that area, also let me know.

tenebs tenebs tenebs!

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Oh, and since TX is so close to the Mexican border, many interesting animals are found there. I think one Chrysina lives wild over there

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Two Chrysina species are found in TX - gloriosa and woodi. They're only in the mountains of the state's far west, though.

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Ahaha I wish, but Ill be towards the coast rather than the desert sadly.

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It's too early for Chrysina to be flying, anyway. In TX, August would be the time to collect them. Port Lavaca is not too far from Megasoma vogti country, but again, wrong time of year - that species is flying mainly in Sept.

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Well, that’s what I’m hoping to find haha! Would it be too early for glowspot click beetles? They’re fairly common in the area according to my grandfather (he tried sending me a couple last year, but USPS accidentally delayed the package and they died in shipping). If it is too early for G.C., is there any way to hunt grubs of them? Would it be like looking in compost for euphoria inda? Flipping over rotting bark in dry areas like euphoria sepulcralis? Or just digging around hoping to get lucky like cotinis nitida? Thanks!

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Oh also, I’m going to be there til the 22nd of may if that helps

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I think that in the wild, the larvae of Gymnetis caseyi specialize in living in the decaying plant material that forms inside of tree holes. The adults come to sap flows on Red oaks and certain other trees. It's probably still too early for adults to be flying, though. Digging around in tree holes (while being careful of biters and stingers, of course) might produce some larvae, though.

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Ahh ok, thank you! Do they emerge later in may? Or in June?

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Not too much research seems to exist on the biology of North American glowing clicks, but given that their relative Pyrophorus can live quite some time as an adult I'd assume that the NAmerican ones are active whenever it's warm enough.

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Ok thanks! Hopefully Ill find something, Im leaving tomorrow.

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The best way to collect Gymnetis caseyi is with a bait trap. Otherwise, you are not likely to see them. I usually mix brown sugar & water. You can add bananas, peaches, or other fruit. Beer & yeast help with fermentation. Works well for that species, as well as for cerambycidae. Callona rimosa will be emerging in early May. Look for them on Mesquite trees (they spend their larval stages in the roots).

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