Jump to content
Pr. Calculus

Greetings from Quebec

Recommended Posts

Greetings,

 

I want to say I am happy to join your community. I am rejoicing that from now on I will be able to share my passion for rhino beetles without nobody thinking it's weird. yet, It's still a little strange, because I don't have any beetle... yet, but if Canadian laws would allow me,I would be a huge collector. You see, all the coolest beetle are in USA. In Canada, it is forbiden to have any excotic phytophagus insect :(. So no dynastes, no megasoma, no chalcosoma, no fun....

 

But it is not against the law to have flesh eating beetles, so I am looking for some Phileurus Truncatus right now.

 

By the way, my name is Pascal and French is my native langage. I wish to become an entomologist, an ambition that will concretized in 4 years... or maybe chimist or forest products processing technician. Not sure yet. Still have the month to decide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, welcome to the forum! And it might be hard to get a hold of, but Xyloryctes jamaicensis is a species of rhino beetle that can be found in south-east Canada. They're about 20-35 mm long. Arthur V Evans' The Beetle of Eastern North America* says that they can be found in Ontario, but I'd assume that means they're probably in parts of Quebec too.

 

 

 

 

*I accidentally put the wrong book title at first, but I edited it. Sorry for the confusion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You see, all the coolest beetle are in USA. In Canada, it is forbiden to have any excotic phytophagus insect :(. So no dynastes, no megasoma, no chalcosoma,

In actuality, the same sort of laws are true in the US. Im pretty sure Chalcosoma is illegal outside of zoos here, and we only have a handful of native (thus legal) Dynastes and Megasoma. Do you know what the US rhino hobbyists are thinking? All the coolest beetles are in Europe (where imports are legal)! ;):D

 

Im not a rhino hobbyist, though.

 

Many under-appreciated but fascinating insects, like carabid ground beetles, can almost certainly be found near you, especially in forests but also even in suburban areas. They may not be as large as tropical stags and rhinos, but they can still be quite beautiful to watch (and sometimes still very colorful)!

 

Welcome here, we hope you enjoy the stay!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forums, hope you enjoy it here! :)

 

 

Do you know what the US rhino hobbyists are thinking? All the coolest beetles are in Europe (where imports are legal)! ;):D

 

And the European breeders are probably thinking, "If only I lived in Japan/Taiwan..."! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the hobby, Pascal! Exotics are illegal for us in the US as well, but luckily we have some our smaller rhinos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In actuality, the same sort of laws are true in the US. Im pretty sure Chalcosoma is illegal outside of zoos here, and we only have a handful of native (thus legal) Dynastes and Megasoma. Do you know what the US rhino hobbyists are thinking? All the coolest beetles are in Europe (where imports are legal)! ;):D

 

 

 

I was confused. Here in USA, you are indeed subjected to similar restrictions regarding invertebrate. Europeans, japaneses and Taiwanese are the ones to envy haha. Thank you all. I am touched by your warm welcome. I got the feeling I will feel at ease here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, welcome to the forum! And it might be hard to get a hold of, but Xyloryctes jamaicensis is a species of rhino beetle that can be found in south-east Canada. They're about 20-35 mm long. Arthur V Evans' The Beetle of Eastern North America* says that they can be found in Ontario, but I'd assume that means they're probably in parts of Quebec too.

 

 

 

 

*I accidentally put the wrong book title at first, but I edited it. Sorry for the confusion.

Thank you for sharing this information with me! I didn't know we could find species of the Xyloryctes gender that far to the north. I will read on this specie. However, I am not looking for a beetle to have as pet . I need,for a research, a beetle whose larva will grow fast and enormous on a rotten wood diet . That's why I was interested in getting Phileurus Truncatus. The purpose of my personal research is to measure the potential of beetle to convert residual woody biomass into a source of protein.

Welcome to the hobby, Pascal! Exotics are illegal for us in the US as well, but luckily we have some our smaller rhinos.

At last, another Dynastes lover!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the research, you may want to investigate Tenebrio molitor and Zophobas morio, which are sold alive as pet food and fishbait in stores. Unfortunately for you, they are not rhinos and have no horns.

 

Fortunately,

 

-They seem more fast-breeding than most rhinos. Speaking from experience, 2 or 3 Zophobas females will produce so many eggs that you will soon run out of containers!

 

-Even though Tenebrio and Zophobas are commercially raised on grains, rotten wood/leaves can be used as the primary diet.

 

- Adult darklings are very long-lived. I have kept Zophobas adults alive for almost a full year!

 

 

 

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the research, you may want to investigate Tenebrio molitor and Zophobas morio, which are sold alive as pet food and fishbait in stores. Unfortunately for you, they are not rhinos and have no horns.

 

Fortunately,

 

-They seem more fast-breeding than most rhinos. Speaking from experience, 2 or 3 Zophobas females will produce so many eggs that you will soon run out of containers!

 

-Even though Tenebrio and Zophobas are commercially raised on grains, rotten wood/leaves can be used as the primary diet.

 

- Adult darklings are very long-lived. I have kept Zophobas adults alive for almost a full year!

 

 

 

Good luck

 

I can take no horn, even though it would have added the «cool factor» ;) . I am amazed to learn that mealworms can actually digest rotten wood too. Now I have no choice but to give it a try. However, their growth must be slower on a rotten wood diet than wheat flour, right? Thank you very much for the information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can take no horn, even though it would have added the «cool factor» ;) . I am amazed to learn that mealworms can actually digest rotten wood too. Now I have no choice but to give it a try. However, their growth must be slower on a rotten wood diet than wheat flour, right? Thank you very much for the information.

 

This is not as surprising as it first appears. I’m pretty sure that there are no piles of oats sitting around in the forest.

 

Furthermore, some members here breed “exotic” (non-grain-infesting) darklings like Eleodes and Embaphion; the larvae of those are normally fed old leaves/wood and dehydrate in flour.

 

 

If you wish to quicken growth of mealworms, an old apple or pear should do the trick

 

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×