Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Keep them in rotten leaf substrate, some sand as they get older, and supplement feed them. I usually use a turtle hatchling formula for flower beetles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young larvae will need a rotten leaf/wood substrate, but after a few molts you can keep them on just coconut fiber, their main diet from there on consists of protein, dog food or live prey work well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young larvae will need a rotten leaf/wood substrate, but after a few molts you can keep them on just coconut fiber, their main diet from there on consists of protein, dog food or live prey work well.

That's good, anything on pupation/breeding?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They need some sand to make good pupal cells, and it can’t be too humid/wet. Breeding is (according to Orin) very easy, and females have been known to lay eggs in 1/2 inch of substrate (though I would recommend at least three inches)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They need some sand to make good pupal cells, and it can’t be too humid/wet. Breeding is (according to Orin) very easy, and females have been known to lay eggs in 1/2 inch of substrate (though I would recommend at least three inches)

You serial? What kind of sub?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, it says so in Orins book. Leaf substrate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, what “serial”?

I think it's either short for serious, or he misspelled serious and autocorrect changed it to "serial". :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adult females do well laying in similar substrate that you would use for Dynastes. I add crushed leaves into the mix and a layer of whole and crushed leaves on the surface.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More info..

 

- Don't house males in egg laying containers with females

- Don't use coco fiber as a larval substrate unless you wet it first, let it sit for a few days, then freeze it for a few days

- Don't house larvae together

 

I have the correct and tested pupation substrate available - possibly the only place in the world selling it right now. It is ready to use, can be reused many times and will stop them from wandering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

- Don't use coco fiber as a larval substrate unless you wet it first, let it sit for a few days, then freeze it for a few days

 

That seems oddly specific, why do you need to let it sit for a few days and then freeze it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went through a few different "batches", testing out different substrate mixes - and I seemed to end up with around twice as many mites in the substrate where I used coco fiber. This could have been coincidence - I need to test more, but my thought was there may have been mite eggs that survived desiccation that were already in the purchased substrate (the coco brick type). Wetting them should cause them to hatch then kill them by freezing. This could be overkill, but I dislike mites..

 

Soil (yard) or organic potting soil should work just a well, but again you should heat or freeze treat it first..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went through a few different "batches", testing out different substrate mixes - and I seemed to end up with around twice as many mites in the substrate where I used coco fiber. This could have been coincidence - I need to test more, but my thought was there may have been mite eggs that survived desiccation that were already in the purchased substrate (the coco brick type). Wetting them should cause them to hatch then kill them by freezing. This could be overkill, but I dislike mites..

 

Soil (yard) or organic potting soil should work just a well, but again you should heat or freeze treat it first..

Ah, OK! I haven't had any mite problems using coconut fiber for my inverts yet, even if I did though, I've got both springtails and a couple other, less harmful mite species that usually take care of any grain mites I get in short order.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nah, Hisserdude.

 

You just keep too many desert darklings for the arachnids' safety!

 

 

(just joking, I know you keep Lanxoblatta in a steamy cage)

 

On a more serious note, could a few mites or their dormant stages have hitchhiked on the goliath grubs unnoticed?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hisserdude: Nice! Again, I'm not sure if this is what happened but it seemed like it. With the high protein diet for the grubs (and feeding every other day) I was having mite explosions.

 

The springtails would be cool, I do have to change the substrate frequently though, because of all the protein - it goes sour quickly.

 

 

AlexW: Possibly so, but they were turning up more in the containers with coco fiber. I actually just thought of a test, I could wet some coco fiber by itself, then add some protein just to see what happens. I would keep it away from the grub area to try to minimize cross contamination..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nah, Hisserdude.

 

You just keep too many desert darklings for the arachnids' safety!

 

(just joking, I know you keep Lanxoblatta in a steamy cage)

 

On a more serious note, could a few mites or their dormant stages have hitchhiked on the goliath grubs unnoticed?

Funnily enough, my Tenebs are one of the few inverts I own that frequently get grain mite infestations, on account of their enclosures being just a little too dry for the springtails and other mite species to do well in, but just humid enough to allow grain mites to breed. That, and the fact that the larvae drag food down into the substrate creates grain mite heaven. -_- Most of my really humid roach enclosures are so full of springtails or other mite species that there's no way grain mite populations can ever take a firm hold.

 

Hisserdude: Nice! Again, I'm not sure if this is what happened but it seemed like it. With the high protein diet for the grubs (and feeding every other day) I was having mite explosions.

 

The springtails would be cool, I do have to change the substrate frequently though, because of all the protein - it goes sour quickly.

You should get some Sinella curviseta, they are as prolific as all heck and can help with mold and mite problems. Admittedly though, I'm having grain mite problems in some of my Pyrophorus larvae enclosures, as they are very messy eaters and even springtails can't keep up with all the leftovers they leave in their tunnels.

 

However, there's a mite species in my collection that is almost the same size as grain mites, and take up the exact same ecological niche as them, but are dark red, and lack a phoretic stage. I've noticed enclosures with these mites are usually completely lacking in grain mites, so I've begun introducing them to my Pyrophorus enclosures, (as the only reason grain mites disturb them is because of their phoretic stage).

 

I think these have some serious potential as a grain mite deterrent, as they lack the harmful phoretic stage grain mites have, and are very secretive, burrowing down into substrate when disturbed rather than scaling whatever comes across their path, like some other mites. Alongside springtails, (which keep their numbers in check), they seem to really work well to keep grain mites at bay. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be cautious, perhaps maybe those red mites are not as harmless as you think.

 

Also, as I have stated, the only moisture in my own two-teneb cage currently comes from their food, and I serve that on a toilet-paper "plate" to avoid wetting the cage ;) I kind of doubt that even a dermestid larva could survive in there!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be cautious, perhaps maybe those red mites are not as harmless as you think.

 

Also, as I have stated, the only moisture in my own two-teneb cage currently comes from their food, and I serve that on a toilet-paper "plate" to avoid wetting the cage ;) I kind of doubt that even a dermestid larva could survive in there!

Eh, they are in practically all of my well established cockroach or isopod colonies, and besides the fluke with my Cariblatta minima colony, they don't seem to be causing problems. And it seems like lots of people have them anyway, they are just secretive and kept in check by healthy springtail populations.

 

Needless to say, I'll still be keeping an eye on them, and without springtails they can cause problems for some small invertebrates, but for the Pyrophorus I think they will be a very helpful addition to the micro-fauna in their enclosures. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this thread is old, but I thought I would add a few details and ask a question that I did not see addressed above. First, I think I have found a thorough guide for rearing these beetles at http://www.naturalworlds.org/goliathus/manual/Goliathus_breeding_1.htm. Second, I have talked with one of several pioneers in Goliathus rearing, Jonathan Lai, and he recommended a high protein fish food since it has less fat than dog food (he uses Hai Feng Alife koi pellets). Third, Goliathus pupal cells are constructed in clay not sand. Finally, I read in this thread about some people trying to prevent mites in the larval chambers by not using coconut coir, and I have always used coconut coir with minimal issues. Obviously, Goliathus larvae require a lot of effort to rear, and one doesn't want to take chances with something harming them. I have never had issues, however, with mites in the coconut coir harming my beetle larvae. Is it possible that the mites could be beneficial in a way similar to how mites benefit some species of millipedes like the Archispirostreptus? If it would still be a bad idea to allow the mites to live in the enclosure, would autoclaving affect coconut fiber in any way or is freezing better? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the amount of protein they are fed I change the larval substrate pretty regularly, which helps keep the mite numbers down. (the substrate can also collect too much moisture or go bad pretty easily).

Yes, don't use the substrate/sand mixture for pupation, it works but is not ideal. I'm pretty sure I'm the only person selling the correct (and tested) pupation substrate so far

These mites are not the good type, they can overrun the larvae containers and congregate on the food pellets. They can also block sphericals..

Steven

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, darktheumbreon said:

Sorry if this is like a question that's not supposed to be asked... but where is everyone getting these Goliath beetles?

The USDA recently removed the permit requirement on them and a few people imported some and are starting to breed them in the US. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×