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The Mantis Menagerie

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Everything posted by The Mantis Menagerie

  1. The Mantis Menagerie

    Plant collecting

    Still, I don't have much room to stuff 18-gallon totes.
  2. The Mantis Menagerie

    Bug collecting.

    Wow! Okay, I have never found that many.
  3. The Mantis Menagerie

    Bug collecting.

    Not so fast! All I can seem to find in NC are Lucanus elephas. They are everywhere (at least when compared to other large species).
  4. The Mantis Menagerie

    Plant collecting

    I am not sure where I would store that much substrate! My yard is covered in oak leaves. I just gathered a big bag of them today before they get wet and moldy.
  5. The Mantis Menagerie

    AAA's Swarm

    I think any large roach enjoys poking handlers. Even my G. portentosa can be quite prickly.
  6. The Mantis Menagerie

    AAA's Swarm

    I want some A. tesselata eventually. I notice you are holding them. Are they easy to handle? I read that they were easier to hold than Blaberus species since they are calmer. Can you confirm this?
  7. The Mantis Menagerie

    Alaus oculatus molted to L4???

    I have been raising this A. oculatus grub, and I have been keeping careful track of its molts. I have had it since it was an L2 grub, and it molted once back in the fall. I went to check on it today, though, and I found it had molted again but was still a larva. The strange thing is that it did not seem to be any larger after this molt, whereas I immediately noticed the size difference when it molted from L2 to L3. I even made sure that the shed exoskeleton I was looking at was indeed the grub's exoskeleton, and it definitely belonged to the grub. How is this possible? I have an adult A. oculatus that I got as an L3 grub at the same time as I got this grub, but that larva did not molt in my care except to become a pupa and then enclose. The adult is currently in hibernation as I am waiting for this larva to become an adult and be ready for breeding, so are there any ways to tell this grub to hurry up?
  8. The Mantis Menagerie

    Alaus oculatus molted to L4???

    I looked in the ultimate guide, but I only saw it mention darlings having a variable number of instars. I need to find time actually read the book in its entirety. Since this thing seems fat enough to pupate, I might try to coax it into hurrying up. Is there a max limit on the amount of time a beetle can spend in hibernation? What temperature would you recommend?
  9. The Mantis Menagerie

    AAA's Coleoptera Corner

    I have two questions. First, where do you find Mezium affine in the US? Second, what do these beetles eat?
  10. The Mantis Menagerie

    Phalacrognathus muelleri

    This page seems to have good information on rearing them. I have never tried rearing P. muelleri because I live in the US, so it may be wrong. Regardless, here is the link: http://beetlesaspets.blogspot.com/2014/04/the-rainbow-stag-beetle-phalacrognathus.html?m=0.
  11. The Mantis Menagerie

    Promethea, cynthia, ceceopia help!!!!!!

    I thought I would add this link in case anyone comes across this thread in the future looking for information. It is a link to a database of host plants for hundreds of species of Lepidoptera. http://www.nhm.ac.uk/our-science/data/hostplants/search/browse.dsml
  12. This is my first Mcmonigle book, and I got it yesterday. It seems very thorough, but I noticed one thing I wanted to have clarified. In the book, it mentions fermenting wood, but it says that the wood must start as rotten wood. I was under the impression that fermentation was like artificially rotting the wood. I will admit that I haven't read it in its entirety as I have not had much time the past couple days. I did spend about an hour reviewing it, but I need to go back and read everything. If this topic is mentioned in a different part of the book, then please tell me. Otherwise, it covers just about every species I have been looking to breed, and I think it was worth the price.
  13. The Mantis Menagerie

    Beetle Identifications

    I found a couple different types of beetles that I am not familiar with. I was on a trip, and I found these in Scotland Neck, NC if that helps to narrow it down. Here is the first one. I was thinking it might be some sort of darkling beetle. Here is the second one. I was thinking it looked like either a darkling beetle or a maybe a carabid. If anyone can identify these beetles, then do you know what they eat and how to breed them? I found them inside a log, and since it is December, I was going to put them in the fridge to hibernate.
  14. The Mantis Menagerie

    Alobates pensylvanica care?

    I can't find much information on these beetles, but they look interesting. I caught three yesterday in a rotten log, and I wanted to know if it was possible to breed them. I saw that Lucanus started a thread on these a long time ago, but it looks like he hasn't been on the forum in a while. Anyone know about their care in captivity? I currently have them in the fridge hibernating to give me a bit more time to figure out how to care for them.
  15. The Mantis Menagerie

    Goliath beetle

    On a slightly different note, how strong are the jaws of Goliath beetle larvae. Can they chew through a typical deli cup or are their mandibles not that strong?
  16. The Mantis Menagerie

    Goliath beetle

    Where would they get that kind of documentation? The other two seem better studied.
  17. The Mantis Menagerie

    Beetle Identifications

    I think I have the first one identified: a false mealworm beetle (Alobates pensylvanica). I submitted it on iNaturalist. I am still wondering about the second one, but I think it is in the genus Penthe, which is in the polypore fungus beetle family. Considering the logs I found them in were covered in turkey-tail fungi (Trametes versicolor) and other polypore fungi, it seems to fit. I am going to try and find a thread about these beetles, otherwise, I will start a new thread.
  18. The Mantis Menagerie

    Goliath beetle

    Out of curiosity, why did the USDA choose G. cacicus, and C. regius as two of the species to deregulate? I would think that since G. orientalis and G. albosignatus are more common, there would be more information showing them to be harmless, whereas I have barely seen anything about G. cacicus and C. regius. Since I am trying to get the permits, is there anything unusual about life cycles of G. orientalis and G. albosignatus that I should be aware of, @Beetle-Experience?
  19. The Mantis Menagerie

    How to Find Beetles

    Most of the species you mentioned can be found in rotting hardwood logs. The exception, of course, is the dung beetles, which eat dung. To find a rhinoceros or stag beetle, I would suggest finding old, soft, well-decayed logs. Then, (with the landowner's permission) roll the logs and look under them, take a few pieces of bark off, and break it at places where the bark easily gives way. Try not to destroy the entire log as other animals may be living in the log that you can't see. For dung beetles, I have heard that one of the best ways to find Them is to go to a farm and turn over horse or cow dung.
  20. The Mantis Menagerie

    Deilelater physoderus

    Deilelater physoderus seems to be the prevalent species of bioluminescent click beetle in Texas. Has anyone ever reared this species? I would assume that it would have the same care as a Pyrophorus sp. beetle? I am looking to start a colony as they seem to be the most common member of the tribe Pyrophorini in the US.
  21. The Mantis Menagerie

    BDFB Larva starting to Pupate

    I think Zophobas morio is a little bit complex to raise since they usually do not pupate in the presence of other larvae. Mealworms, on the other hand, can be raised by sticking them in a bin with some oats and leaving them for a couple months.
  22. The Mantis Menagerie

    faster fermentation through pyrolysis?

    If you want to try this idea (Note: I don't know much about the nature and importance of lignin in beetle substrate as I am more familiar with the carnivorous insects such as Alaus oculatus), then you could try heating the wood in an autoclave or pressure cooker (maybe the added pressure might help denature the lignin?). Otherwise, I agree with the other users who have posted, heating fine wood chips to above 200-degrees Celsius is probably a bad idea.
  23. The Mantis Menagerie

    BDFB Larva starting to Pupate

    Just to clarify: are you saying this is the first beetle larvae you have ever raised (we will assume mealworms don't count)? If so, that is incredible. I have looked at trying to breed them before, and it looked like it was nearly impossible to successfully raise them.
  24. The Mantis Menagerie

    Goliath beetle

    My ultimate goal if I am able to breed sufficient numbers of beetles and other arthropods would be to sell them (either alive or as dead specimens). I have been told by Dr. Wehling that I might be able to get the commercial entomological supply permits for a few species which would allow me to sell to non-permit holders similar to the way Josh's Frogs' permits work for feeder insects (don't get your hopes up though, he did not mention exotic beetles) Otherwise, as long as both the seller and the buyer have permits to move the arthropod between the relevant states, then it is legal to sell them. Currently, I do not know of any other private individual who has permits, so I would probably try to sell captive-reared invertebrates to insectariums. Because they are captive bred, I should be able to sell them cheaper since I will not be paying the high importation prices. The only problem I foresee in this plan is the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). I know the institutions that are members of AZA have to buy from AZA-approved sources (I heard that they want to make sure everything is done in compliance with CITES, ESA, and just sustainably in general, which although it is a good thing, it might mean even more permits). I am hoping to join the Terrestrial Invertebrate Taxon Advisory Group (TITAG) next year, and that is a subgroup of AZA which might simplify things.
  25. The Mantis Menagerie

    Goliath beetle

    Vague and open-ended describe most of the USDA laws I have come across. Unless you violate the permit conditions, you should just be able to renew your permit every three years.
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