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Goliathus

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About Goliathus

  • Rank
    Pupa
  • Birthday 02/27/1973

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    The Living Planet
  • Interests
    Coleoptera (esp. Scarabaeidae, Lucanidae, Cerambycidae, Buprestidae & Curculionidae)

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  1. Goliathus

    Buddleia davidii

    Yes - they do give off a very noticeable smell, similar to lilac (Syringa spp.). Undoubtedly, this is why they attract butterflies so strongly. Some more photos of my dwarf Buddleia (cultivar ID: Buddleia x 'SMNBDL' ppaf), which is starting to flower more now. Interestingly, although it's currently my smallest plant, it has the largest blooms.
  2. Goliathus

    Chrysina beyeri

    Since gloriosa is smaller than beyeri, I'm sure you could keep at least 25 or maybe even 30 larvae together in something the size of a half-filled, 10 gal. aquarium without having them get in each other's way when they are ready to build pupal cells. I've always just been careful not to crowd beetle larvae (of any species) too much. Chrysina larvae don't have cannibalistic tendencies, and won't bother each other even when kept at rather high densities - there just needs to be plenty of room for them to space themselves apart when the time comes to build cells, and not all of them will do so at the same time; rather, a few will do so early on, followed by the majority some time after, and then finally the last few.
  3. Goliathus

    Chrysina beyeri

    The time period between pupation and emergence doesn't seem to be very long - it's the larva's pre-pupal, winter diapause that takes some months. It's difficult to know the exact amount of time involved with the various stages in this and other Chrysina species though, since they often construct fully enclosed cells, or, even if they do leave a small "window" into the cell through which they can be observed, the eventual pupa becomes completely obscured by the stretched larval skin that forms a loose envelope around it after the molt. The larvae are quite easy to rear on the same type of decayed hardwood substrate as is used for most Dynastinae and Cetoniinae. The key factor for success with Chrysina is to make sure that once the larvae start reaching full size and are beginning to turn from white to pale yellow, they are provided with a layer of clay soil at the bottom of their container, in which they will build pupal cells. See the following post for more info - http://beetleforum.net/topic/3899-chrysina-beyeri-gloriosa/ You can either keep each larva individually in a 16 oz container, as shown in the above link, or, 20 to 25 larvae as a group in a 10 gal. aquarium or equivalent-sized plastic box.
  4. Goliathus

    Chrysina beyeri

    A Purple-legged Jewel Scarab (Chrysina beyeri) (captive reared) that just emerged today. Some coleopterists are of the opinion that it's the most beautiful of the US Chrysina spp.
  5. Goliathus

    Buddleia davidii

    I think the Chrysobothris might be C. femorata. I planted a lot of Anethum (dill) and Petroselinum (parsley) this year as food plants for Papilio polyxenes (Black swallowtail).
  6. Goliathus

    Buddleia davidii

    They're already attracting butterflies more strongly than anything else I've seen - especially many Nymphalidae, such as Vanessa atalanta. Monarchs and swallowtails, too. Also - various click beetles, the flower scarab Euphoria sepulcralis, and was surprised to see a buprestid of the genus Chrysobothris (which I wasn't aware came to flowers).
  7. Goliathus

    Buddleia davidii

    Several new (new to me, at least) cultivars of Buddleia davidii that I've started working with this year - a standard-sized pale blue, standard-sized fuchsia, and a dwarf amethyst variety.
  8. Goliathus

    Alaus lusciosus

    Yes, Alaus is a very interesting genus with at least 6 species in the US. The genus Chalcolepidius, with nearly a dozen species found in the US, are equally impressive in their own way and if anyone could ever work out how to reliably captive breed any of them, that would be quite an accomplishment. C. apacheanus and the similar-looking C. webbi are the largest US species. Like those of Alaus, the larvae of Chalcolepidius are predatory. They live in decaying wood where they feed on other beetle larvae and termites. I've collected the iridescent green C. smaragdinus on Baccharis plants in the Santa Rita Mtns. (AZ).
  9. Goliathus

    Alaus lusciosus

    A large female Alaus lusciosus, one of the southwestern species of eyed elaters. Similar to A. zunianus, apart from some slight differences in the markings.
  10. Goliathus

    Polyphemus moths

    I've reared polyphemus on oaks in the Red Oak (Lobatae) group, but I'd not be surprised if they would also accept the leaves of broad-leaf oaks from other groups. What I used, was my locally common Quercus buckleyi. JKim I attempted rearing Actias luna, Dryocampa rubicunda, Eacles imperialis, Automeris io, etc. which are known to feed on red oaks, did not actually fed on oak at all and just died in hunger. So what I think is that there are some different host preference over where the original specimen (or parent specimens) are collected. Say... If you collected a mated female in a maple forest, then the caterpillar's primary preference would potentially be maple and similar species, not pine or oak. Just my thoughts over my experience... True - it appears that for various Lepidoptera species, the preferred host plant varies by geographic location. I tried feeding different plants (red oak, sweetgum, pines) for Actias luna (caterpillars from a mated female I collected), but caterpillars only fed on sweetgum, which was interesting. The mated female is collected in a pine forest with some sweetgums and oaks were available here and there. The exact location where I found the mated female had sweetgums all over the place. SO... I think that's why the caterpillars only fed on sweetgums, instead of pines (or oak). It seems that some saturniid species may be more particular than others in regard to their food plant preference. For example, many years ago, I reared some luna caterpillars (from a locally collected moth) on oak without any problems. Then, two years ago, I again very successfully reared a group (again from a locally collected moth) on sweetgum, as I had heard that luna was known to do well on it. As compared to oak, sweetgum is not particularly common in my area. But, it may simply be that the luna in my area is not very particular about food plant preference. In any case however, caterpillars that are started on one host plant should be maintained on that plant for the rest of their development, as they might not be able to easily adapt to a different kind.
  11. Goliathus

    Polyphemus moths

    Whatever species of oak is the most common in your area, that's probably the best one to try first. But, polyphemus accepts quite a wide variety of food plants, including elm, hickory, walnut and sweet gum, to name a few. The main thing to remember when rearing the caterpillars is to be very careful about the humidity level, and definitely don't use an airtight container, as a build-up of moisture and carbon dioxide released by the leaves can quickly kill them, especially when newly hatched. Same for eggs. Some basic rearing info.
  12. Most of the rather expensive books I've ever bought that were made with good quality inks / paper (including FTLORASB 3rdEd) do have a noticeable smell. I'm confident that the "aroma" isn't actually harmful - certainly, it can't be compared to "new car" or "new carpet" smell, which really can be really unbearable to those with chemical sensitivities. I have books that I bought new over 30 years ago, and they still have their own unique, individual odors - I could easily identify some of them just by their odor alone. Anyway - one thing you might try that actually works to pull the smell out of many books, is to seal the book up airtight in a plastic bag with a bunch of fresh, crumpled newspaper. Somehow, when sealed in an airtight situation, the odor from the book gets absorbed into the newspaper. You may have to change out the newspaper every few weeks for a while to get the best results, until the odor of the book is either greatly reduced or eliminated. With any luck, this method will work for you.
  13. Goliathus

    Anthia sexmaculata(sexguttata) in the us?

    Things like this do tend to sell out pretty fast. You might contact Peter to see if he expects to have more soon, though.
  14. Goliathus

    Anthia sexmaculata(sexguttata) in the us?

    Bugs In Cyberspace has both of them from time to time (see their beetle page for current offers). They just got in some Dejean's Tiger Beetles, in case you're interested in those. It's a species that I've only ever seen pictured in books, and is rarely available for sale.
  15. Goliathus

    Emerald Euphoria (Euphoria fulgida)

    Will post updates on my progress with them. Another species I'd like to eventually try rearing is Euphoria monticola (Arizona), which has a blue-green color when viewed from certain angles. Another photo.
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