Jump to content


Photo

Pupating Zophobas morio

pupation pupating darkling zophobas

  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 PowerHobo

PowerHobo

    L2

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 38 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Las Vegas, NV, USA
  • Interests:Music, beetles, coding, 3D printing, propmaking, the list goes on.

Posted 08 November 2017 - 11:10 AM

My daughter has been raising some Z. morio, and they're all large enough to pupate now (28mm+). After I explained to her that they pupate once separated individually without food in a dark place, she would only consent to attempting it with 10 larve, as she's convinced we're going to starve them to death.

 

Naturally, all 10 died, and I now have an 11-year-old wearing her sassy "I told you so" pants.

 

This is the exact method I used to pupate Z. morio as a kid, with the only difference being the containers. As a kid, I used film canisters, and now we're using thoroughly cleaned vitamin bottles with some air holes just because they're what I had on hand; do they require the tight space to pupate? Or better yet: do they need a bit of food in their container, and was I just an unknowing sadist as a child?

 

Bonus fail: "Don't worry, they don't bite." - they totally bite. The girlspawn discovered this last night.


Currently raising: Dynastes tityus, Dynastes granti, Megasoma punctulatus, Chrysina gloriosa, Zophobas morio


#2 Stag Beetles

Stag Beetles

    L3

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 83 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Amazon rainforest
  • Interests:BEETLES, Photography, insects, wildflowers, rainforests, lizards, animals, Latin, art, Math, Algebra, Geometry, etc.

Posted 08 November 2017 - 04:16 PM

Did you put sand for it to take for substrate?  Unless I'm wrong, I think that beetle larvae in general love sand.  Also don't put too much, because they could get too excited about it and wind up with a big pile of sand in their pupal chamber, which is not good...


Add me on instagram: Lucanus__Kawaii, aka Eleodes hispilabris on Beetle Forum (this account I need to try to recover)...

IMG_2198.PNG IMG_2193.PNG IMG_2198.PNG
 

 


#3 PowerHobo

PowerHobo

    L2

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 38 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Las Vegas, NV, USA
  • Interests:Music, beetles, coding, 3D printing, propmaking, the list goes on.

Posted 08 November 2017 - 04:48 PM

I did not. I've never heard that; I always kept them in ground oats as substrate, then fully without substrate when pupating. I'll have to look into this, thanks!


Currently raising: Dynastes tityus, Dynastes granti, Megasoma punctulatus, Chrysina gloriosa, Zophobas morio


#4 Bugboy3092

Bugboy3092

    Pupa

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 103 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Georgia
  • Interests:Beetles, kinda why I'm here.

Posted 08 November 2017 - 04:50 PM

28 millimeters is way too small for z. Morio to pupate, they're usually mature around 2 inches (45+ millimeters) although yes they do need separation, that part is correct, make sure it isn't too large, small deli cups are good, and yes no food or substrate as it may stop them from pupating.

#5 Hisserdude

Hisserdude

    Stag Beetle

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,044 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Idaho, USA
  • Interests:Keeping inverts, including beetles, (especially darkling beetles). Also gardening, reading, playing monster hunter and minecraft, and watching Doctor Who and MLP:FIM.

Posted 08 November 2017 - 07:51 PM

No substrate is needed for this particular species to pupate, and will in fact make things more difficult. And yeah you isolated them way too early, they need to be a lot bigger to pupate, otherwise you WILL starve them to death...

Darklings: Alobates pensylvanica, Coelocnemis californicus, Coelus ciliatus, Eleodes clavicornis, Eleodes hispilabris, Eleodes nigrinus, Embaphion cf. contusum, Embaphion muricatum, Eusattus muricatus, Meracantha contracta, Platydema ellipticum, Tenebrio molitor, Tenebrio obscurus, Tenebrionid sp, Zophobas morio. Ground beetles: Pasimachus sp. "Arizona". Click beetles: 1 Alaus melanops larva, Ampedus sp, Elateridae sp larva, Elaterid sp larvae, Melanotus cf. similis, Melanotus sp, Pyrophorus noctilucus. Also: A bunch of cockroach species, spiders, isopods, and a cat. For a full list of my invertebrates, See my blog! http://invertebratedude.blogspot.com/


#6 AlexW

AlexW

    Pupa

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 160 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Interests:Nature and Artificial Life

Posted 08 November 2017 - 08:21 PM

There are only two types of insects: the ones that nobody (scientists included) knows anything about, and the ones that everybody thinks they know about.

 

Zophobas falls into the latter category.

 

Do not trust the reptile and fishbait sites that look credible but are filled with inaccuracies. Even the Cincinnati Zoo has mistakenly stated that Zophobas is flightless and has fused elytra. This is obviously not true; I have seen it fly myself (though this is uncommon), and McMonigle's Ultimate Guide states that all feeder (Zophobas, Tenebrio) and grain pests (flour beetles) can fly well. The zoo probably read that Eleodes giant darklings are flightless, which is true, and plastered the label to the entire Tenebrionidae.

 

I have also raised Z. morio myself, and here are a few tips:

 

1. The larvae will pupate even if food is available. Great anti-starvation tip, but no one ever mentions it, though.

 

2. I have pupated several larvae (one per cage) in a plastic cage filled with shallow dirt. They made an oval depression on the soil surface before pupating. Dirt pupation is not suggested because it takes up too much space

 

3. Adults will lay eggs in anything, including paper tissue. One or two females can make tons of larvae, so keep all your beetles separate if you don't want to use their offspring as feeder insects. Identifying sex of adults is not a solution. Males are on top when mating, but they are so zealous that they will mate with other males.

 

4. Zophobas is great, but wild native darklings are also very interesting. Since you live in a desert, I imagine there are some great desert darklings in wilderness areas. Ask Hisserdude to help you with these, because my post is long enough already.

 

 

 

Stag Beetles: The sand is for flower scarab grubs, according to the Ult. Guide.

 

 

Normally I am reluctant to log in here due to computer issues, but I am expecting to be more active in bugguide forums (user Eleodes) or on my blog talk page (sp-uns@blogspot@com, replace @ with .)

 

 

Cheers, everyone!

 


Visit my blog!

 

Due to computer issues, I currently have trouble with beetleforum logins.


#7 Stag Beetles

Stag Beetles

    L3

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 83 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Amazon rainforest
  • Interests:BEETLES, Photography, insects, wildflowers, rainforests, lizards, animals, Latin, art, Math, Algebra, Geometry, etc.

Posted 09 November 2017 - 07:50 PM

There are only two types of insects: the ones that nobody (scientists included) knows anything about, and the ones that everybody thinks they know about.

 

Zophobas falls into the latter category.

 

Do not trust the reptile and fishbait sites that look credible but are filled with inaccuracies. Even the Cincinnati Zoo has mistakenly stated that Zophobas is flightless and has fused elytra. This is obviously not true; I have seen it fly myself (though this is uncommon), and McMonigle's Ultimate Guide states that all feeder (Zophobas, Tenebrio) and grain pests (flour beetles) can fly well. The zoo probably read that Eleodes giant darklings are flightless, which is true, and plastered the label to the entire Tenebrionidae.

 

I have also raised Z. morio myself, and here are a few tips:

 

1. The larvae will pupate even if food is available. Great anti-starvation tip, but no one ever mentions it, though.

 

2. I have pupated several larvae (one per cage) in a plastic cage filled with shallow dirt. They made an oval depression on the soil surface before pupating. Dirt pupation is not suggested because it takes up too much space

 

3. Adults will lay eggs in anything, including paper tissue. One or two females can make tons of larvae, so keep all your beetles separate if you don't want to use their offspring as feeder insects. Identifying sex of adults is not a solution. Males are on top when mating, but they are so zealous that they will mate with other males.

 

4. Zophobas is great, but wild native darklings are also very interesting. Since you live in a desert, I imagine there are some great desert darklings in wilderness areas. Ask Hisserdude to help you with these, because my post is long enough already.

 

 

 

Stag Beetles: The sand is for flower scarab grubs, according to the Ult. Guide.

 

 

Normally I am reluctant to log in here due to computer issues, but I am expecting to be more active in bugguide forums (user Eleodes) or on my blog talk page (sp-uns@blogspot@com, replace @ with .)

 

 

Cheers, everyone!

 

TruTru


Add me on instagram: Lucanus__Kawaii, aka Eleodes hispilabris on Beetle Forum (this account I need to try to recover)...

IMG_2198.PNG IMG_2193.PNG IMG_2198.PNG
 

 


#8 PowerHobo

PowerHobo

    L2

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 38 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Las Vegas, NV, USA
  • Interests:Music, beetles, coding, 3D printing, propmaking, the list goes on.

Posted 10 November 2017 - 02:35 PM

28 millimeters is way too small for z. Morio to pupate, they're usually mature around 2 inches (45+ millimeters) 

 

And yeah you isolated them way too early, they need to be a lot bigger to pupate

 

I'm going to assume it was a typo, but I might just be an idiot, and I'm not willing to rule that out. *38mm+. I measured her entire colony (including the dead ones that she hasn't disposed of for whatever reason) individually to double check last night, and the absolute smallest (one of the dead ones) is 38mm, and the largest is 51mm (give or take a couple mm for wriggling errors). Out of 35 only 6 larvae are/were smaller than 42mm.

 

Thank you guys for all of the info. We're going to try another batch of them (over 45mm) in some smaller pill bottles with a just a few oats in the bottom and keep our fingers crossed.


Currently raising: Dynastes tityus, Dynastes granti, Megasoma punctulatus, Chrysina gloriosa, Zophobas morio


#9 Hisserdude

Hisserdude

    Stag Beetle

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,044 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Idaho, USA
  • Interests:Keeping inverts, including beetles, (especially darkling beetles). Also gardening, reading, playing monster hunter and minecraft, and watching Doctor Who and MLP:FIM.

Posted 13 November 2017 - 08:31 PM

I'm going to assume it was a typo, but I might just be an idiot, and I'm not willing to rule that out. *38mm+. I measured her entire colony (including the dead ones that she hasn't disposed of for whatever reason) individually to double check last night, and the absolute smallest (one of the dead ones) is 38mm, and the largest is 51mm (give or take a couple mm for wriggling errors). Out of 35 only 6 larvae are/were smaller than 42mm.
 
Thank you guys for all of the info. We're going to try another batch of them (over 45mm) in some smaller pill bottles with a just a few oats in the bottom and keep our fingers crossed.


Hmm, those larger ones should indeed be ready to pupate, maybe put a little bit of food in with them this time, just in case.

Darklings: Alobates pensylvanica, Coelocnemis californicus, Coelus ciliatus, Eleodes clavicornis, Eleodes hispilabris, Eleodes nigrinus, Embaphion cf. contusum, Embaphion muricatum, Eusattus muricatus, Meracantha contracta, Platydema ellipticum, Tenebrio molitor, Tenebrio obscurus, Tenebrionid sp, Zophobas morio. Ground beetles: Pasimachus sp. "Arizona". Click beetles: 1 Alaus melanops larva, Ampedus sp, Elateridae sp larva, Elaterid sp larvae, Melanotus cf. similis, Melanotus sp, Pyrophorus noctilucus. Also: A bunch of cockroach species, spiders, isopods, and a cat. For a full list of my invertebrates, See my blog! http://invertebratedude.blogspot.com/


#10 PowerHobo

PowerHobo

    L2

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 38 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Las Vegas, NV, USA
  • Interests:Music, beetles, coding, 3D printing, propmaking, the list goes on.

Posted 21 November 2017 - 05:40 PM

Just wanted to update with an additional thanks: we did as I mentioned before and isolated the biggest larvae with a small pinch of oats (5-6 flakes) in each container, and all but a couple are curled up to pupate, and a few have already made the leap. My daughter is pretty thrilled about it. I forgot the pupa can sort of "jump" :lol: Thanks again, everybody!

 

 

Attached Files


Currently raising: Dynastes tityus, Dynastes granti, Megasoma punctulatus, Chrysina gloriosa, Zophobas morio


#11 Dragozap

Dragozap

    L3

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 29 November 2017 - 08:51 PM

Congratulations man! Now you just gotta wait a bit and one day find some beautiful darklings in the pupating enclosure!



#12 PowerHobo

PowerHobo

    L2

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 38 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Las Vegas, NV, USA
  • Interests:Music, beetles, coding, 3D printing, propmaking, the list goes on.

Posted 06 December 2017 - 01:05 PM

I'm a few days late in posting this, but she had her first adult emerge! She's got about a dozen pupae at this point and about half of those are darkening up nicely at the eyes and legs, so any day now.

 

This one here is already a nice dark red/brown since this picture, awaiting his/her tank-mates.

Attached Files


Currently raising: Dynastes tityus, Dynastes granti, Megasoma punctulatus, Chrysina gloriosa, Zophobas morio


#13 Dubia4life

Dubia4life

    L1

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Arkansas
  • Interests:Right now: inverts, salamanders, blacksmithing, and music.

Posted 09 December 2017 - 03:37 PM

I'm a few days late in posting this, but she had her first adult emerge! She's got about a dozen pupae at this point and about half of those are darkening up nicely at the eyes and legs, so any day now.
 
This one here is already a nice dark red/brown since this picture, awaiting his/her tank-mates.


Congrats man! Hope they do well for you and your daughter! I remember raising these as lizard food for my last bearded dragon. I always got so attached to the adults lol!





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: pupation, pupating, darkling, zophobas

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users