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Life's little surprises


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#1 Amici Con Coleotteri

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 09:26 AM

Digging in my garden for some isopods, or maybe centipedes, or whatever else I can find (came across some cute rove beetles but I digress), and I found 2 Storeria dekayi under an old bird bath. They were really docile, I'm guessing because it was a chilly morning, and let me pick them up and carry them with no struggle at all. I decided to keep them since we are about to till the garden and this is a very busy area, they stand a better chance with me essentially. I placed them in my "garden" tank...just plants and pill bugs, and immediately they began to mate (oh yea, forgot to mention they are male and female  :P) which went on and off for about 8 hours. They're viviparous so sometime in mid July I should see babies!

 

The male, I named Patchouli.

Attached File  IMG_1478.jpg   108.61KB   1 downloads

 

The female, Lavender.

Attached File  IMG_1479.jpg   90.02KB   0 downloads

 

Off to harvest slugs and worms for them... :wub:

 

Good day all!!!!!



#2 Bill Myers

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 08:38 PM

Nice!  I've got 3 Midland Brown Snakes (Storeria dekayi wrightorum) that I've had for about a year.  Besides slugs and worms, they'll eat crickets, too!  

 

I haven't tried this yet, but I have a hunch they'll also munch down on cockroaches.  I'm going to give that a try in the near future.

 

Cheers 



#3 Greatwun

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 11:43 PM

Very cool. I just found a baby specimen outside my friends apartment a few days ago. I have these large white cinder blocks around my garden. Every spring I flip them and find ring neck snakes, brown snakes and even a pair of pinewoods snakes that have been there for years.

#4 Hisserdude

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 02:58 PM

Wait, these only need bugs to eat, no , mice/rats? I like snakes but I couldn't feed them mice ( poor mice  :(.)


Darklings: Alobates pensylvanica, Coelocnemis californicus, Coelus ciliatus, Eleodes clavicornis, Eleodes hispilabris, Eleodes nigrinus, Embaphion cf. contusum, Embaphion muricatum, Eusattus muricatus, Meracantha contracta, Platydema ellipticum, Tenebrio molitor, Tenebrio obscurus, Tenebrionid sp, Zophobas morio. Ground beetles: Pasimachus sp. "Arizona". Click beetles: 1 Alaus melanops larva, Ampedus sp, Elateridae sp larva, Elaterid sp larvae, Melanotus cf. similis, Melanotus sp, Pyrophorus noctilucus. Also: A bunch of cockroach species, spiders, isopods, and a cat. For a full list of my invertebrates, See my blog! http://invertebratedude.blogspot.com/


#5 Amici Con Coleotteri

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 07:27 AM

Wait, these only need bugs to eat, no , mice/rats? I like snakes but I couldn't feed them mice ( poor mice  :(.)

 

This species eats worms, slugs, and some insects.

 

And yes, I agree, poor mice, which is why my other snakes all get frozen mice (I highly recommend if you really want a snake).  :P



#6 LarvaHunter

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 01:25 AM

I thought the fun of a snake is watching it kill prey at feeding time, I donated a python to my school in 7th grade and I remember most everyone liking it. I can remember the mouse squeaks of death.
You can kill it before feeding so it does not feel pain or injures your snake.
I don't trust how fresh the frozen ones are, it would be better to freeze it yourself or bash its head nice and quick before feeding.

#7 Amici Con Coleotteri

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 01:43 AM

I thought the fun of a snake is watching it kill prey at feeding time, I donated a python to my school in 7th grade and I remember most everyone liking it. I can remember the mouse squeaks of death.
You can kill it before feeding so it does not feel pain or injures your snake.
I don't trust how fresh the frozen ones are, it would be better to freeze it yourself or bash its head nice and quick before feeding.

 

Yea I don't particularly like watching the mice die, not too mention you get too many mice that wanna fight and could do some serious damage to the snake...

 

...and I've bashed, but I don't recommend...nor will I do it again.  :(

 

And dealing with frozen is just like our own frozen foods...you can tell when they are no good.



#8 LarvaHunter

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 08:06 PM

Are they frozen alive or do they kill the mice first?

#9 Amici Con Coleotteri

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Posted 12 April 2014 - 02:07 AM

Pre-killed, death by freezing is cruel.  



#10 Greatwun

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Posted 12 April 2014 - 11:11 PM

I believe they are killed by CO2. I've bought mice from RodentPro for years and really like their quality and prices.

#11 Amici Con Coleotteri

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 02:42 AM

I believe they are killed by CO2. I've bought mice from RodentPro for years and really like their quality and prices.

 

I'm unfamiliar with that company, but I'm definitely going to look into it now!  :)  Thanks!



#12 Greatwun

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 12:47 PM

No problem and you're welcome!

#13 Tolf

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 10:59 PM

"Storeria dekayi, commonly known as the brown snake"

 

First line from wikipedia. That's...a really descriptive common name.

 

As for humanely killing mice, sulfur hexafluoride would probably be better. Lungs detect CO2 levels, not oxygen. A high concentration of CO2 will cause your brain to panic as it thinks it's suffocating, as it is in this case. (CO2 mixed with oxygen has been used therapeutically to inducing panic). Any gas other than CO2 and your lungs don't notice and you (mice being the you in this case) will lose unconsciousness and die without panic or fear.

 

Probably prohibitively expensive, though. They trick the mice into sleeping with lower CO2 levels and then increase it to toxic levels.

 

And now for humor, Neil Patrick Harris on sulfur hexafluoride.



#14 Ratmosphere

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 03:02 PM

Spectacular discovery!



#15 GeneralZero

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 11:00 PM

Nice! It's always nice to see benevolent people amongst the beetle community. I could tell by the way you posted you seem to truly love most organisms :) I want snakes like that, but my girlfriend already feels like the beetles and the dog are enough -3-

#16 Green Bean

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 07:53 AM

What cuties! Hope they do well. 

 

EDIT: In lab settings, rodents are humanely killed in a process called cervical dislocation (ie, their necks are broken in one quick motion which separates the spinal cord from the base of the brain completely). This kills instantly and painlessly, and is definitely more reliably effective than "bashing" them. If you're going to kill rodents yourself, please learn how to do it in a way that's humane for the animal and not distressing for you. Seeing traumatic violence, even if you're the one doing it and even if it's for a purpose you feel ok with, can be bad for you. 

 

EDIT 2: Oops, I should really check the dates on these things before I go resurrecting threads which have been dead for years. Sorry! 






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