Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Yesterday
  2. Have ordered this book from the US on Amazon. It was cheaper than buying a second hand copy on Amazon UK.
  3. Hi there, I’m Matt, from Gloucestershire in the UK. I have been rearing moths/butterflies for a few years and now fancy dipping my toe into the world of beetles. I have a young son who I hope to interest in invertabrates generally as he’ll have plenty of people pushing the vertabrate agenda in his life! Cheers, Matt
  4. Last week
  5. JKim

    Bug collecting.

    Dynastine scarabs are basically everywhere in the United States depending on the species. Dynastes grantii occur in Arizona abundantly, and rarely found in adjacent states. They fly around starting May-June to September to October, however the peak flight season is late August to early September. Its sister species, the D. tityus can be found from eastern Texas west to Georgia north to somewhere near New York. I know there are records in lots of counties in Philadelphia. Try go to Philadelphia in sometime June to July as it is closer than southern states from your location, Maine. Strategus are here and there. Strategus aloeus is considered very common species in Louisiana, and its peak season for adults is from late June to early July in Louisiana. Its sister species, S. antaeus, that is less common can be found from last week of May to first week of June in Louisiana. Somewhere in North or South Carolina has records of Dorcus parallelus as well. It is very small Lucanid beetle, however, is one of the Dorcus species. Lucanus elaphus should be available in Virginia and around. Refer to Bugguide and/or iNaturalist records to see when and where the records been made in your area or nearer area to your state.
  6. JKim

    Plant collecting

    I don't bring in the dead oak tree from forest to make it a substrate. I use wood pellets commercially available for barbecue grilling. It is natural without any chemical substance mixed up in it. It is completely safe and and a lot easier to handle. In case of leaves, I have oak trees in my backyard. I just cut down a huge one because it was too close to a building.
  7. CactusKing

    BDFB Larva starting to Pupate

    Oh I have raised mealworms before. I mean like the first "rare" kind of beetle ya know? Still in a pupal chamber as a pre-pupa sadly. But not dead!
  8. The Mantis Menagerie

    Plant collecting

    Still, I don't have much room to stuff 18-gallon totes.
  9. PowerHobo

    Plant collecting

    It's honestly not as much as it sounds like! It's just four 18-gallon totes. I keep them in the garage since it's nice and cold in the winter to discourage further decomposition.
  10. The Mantis Menagerie

    Bug collecting.

    Wow! Okay, I have never found that many.
  11. Bugboy3092

    Bug collecting.

    Haha, maybe it’s the down south triad, once I found nearly 100 lucanus elaphus grubs in one place (yes I’m sure on their id and no I didn’t take them all)
  12. Bugboy3092

    Plant collecting

    Haha yes, I personally try to stock up right before fall, right when the leaves are oldest and moldiest (the fungus is what’s decaying the leaves) and for the most part that’s my winter supply. If you dig a lit,e you can still find the moldy layer under the fresh leaves, but some of it will have died off and there may be fresh ones mixed in
  13. The Mantis Menagerie

    Bug collecting.

    Not so fast! All I can seem to find in NC are Lucanus elephas. They are everywhere (at least when compared to other large species).
  14. Bugboy3092

    Bug collecting.

    Considering where you live, Georgia is probably your best chance at a good amount of large beetles. South Carolina is good too, but Georgia is probably the best state for lucanus elaphus (they’re plague here)
  15. The Mantis Menagerie

    Plant collecting

    I am not sure where I would store that much substrate! My yard is covered in oak leaves. I just gathered a big bag of them today before they get wet and moldy.
  16. PowerHobo

    Plant collecting

    You can be overstocked on flake soil? 😂 I fermented 120lbs this past summer, and I'm down to my last 5-10lbs, worrying about larvae making it until my next batch is ready. lol Unfortunately, finding an oak tree in Vegas isn't a common occurrence, so I'm pretty much a slave to purchasing leaves. I think collecting like a madman is a good idea, personally.
  17. Goliathus

    Bug collecting.

    Arizona - July through September, depending upon what you're looking for.
  18. Dak.the.bug

    Bug collecting.

    Hello everyone! I have been considering taking a trip to catch some live specimens for myself, so I was looking for some advice. I like horned beetles, and stags, but I also like mantids as well. What state in the US would have the best chance of giving me some cool specimens?
  19. Dak.the.bug

    Plant collecting

    Hello everyone! Edited the original post because I was without caffeine and posted it in the wrong section. I was wondering if everyone collects as much dead oak and stuff as they can before it goes out of season. I collected like a mad man and am now overwhelmed with sticks, leaves, and flake soil.
  20. Earlier
  21. Garin

    lucanus elaphus emergence time?

    Yes, that is totally normal for Lucanus, it's called diapause. Most scarabs will emerge to the surface soon after elcosing but Lucanus will stay in its pupal cell until its the right time of the season to emerge. Generally that is around late May, June. I currently also have many adult Lucanus beetles in their pupal cells in diapause. So as Ratmosphere says "Just leave em be bro". They will eventually emerge from their pupal cells and then you can feed them. Have fun!
  22. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Swarm

    If only they could be trained. lol
  23. The Mantis Menagerie

    AAA's Swarm

    I think any large roach enjoys poking handlers. Even my G. portentosa can be quite prickly.
  24. beetlegeuse

    lucanus elaphus emergence time?

    sorry, was gone for the week but thanks for your responses guys! i think i'll order some more jellies and do as ratmosphere suggests. @jkim, they definitely pupated, and subsequently eclosed in the fall because a bunch of them built their pupal cells such that the pupae were visible through the container walls, and sometime during the late fall, the pupae were no longer present but the shed pupal casing was. i can definitively confirm that they're adults and have been for awhile now, since i gently removed the solidified dirt from their containers to check on them before leaving and all of them are adult beetles that're alive and moving. they just haven't come up to the surface at all. but yeah, i really appreciate the reassurance. i guess i'll sit tight for a while longer and wait for them to come up of their own accord.
  25. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Swarm

    Eurycotis lixa Adult Adult male Adult female Adult pair Mixed-sized nymphs Freshly-molted nymph Ootheca
  26. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Swarm

    Yep, they're pretty slow and laid back at all life-stages. The only bad thing is that it's pretty easy to get stabbed with the leg spikes of larger individuals when initially picking them up, but it also is with things like Blaberus. Besides that, they're great for handling!
  27. The Mantis Menagerie

    AAA's Swarm

    I want some A. tesselata eventually. I notice you are holding them. Are they easy to handle? I read that they were easier to hold than Blaberus species since they are calmer. Can you confirm this?
  28. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Swarm

    Archimandrita tesselata Adult female Adult male (a little pronotum coloration still to come) Freshly-molted adult female Abnormally-black adult male (a little pronotum coloration still to come) Medium-large nymphs Small nymphs
  1. Load more activity
×