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  1. Today
  2. Goliathus

    Hibernation questions for D. Tityus

    Thanks again for the speedy responses! His pupa is at the poin when the eyes and mouthparts are dark amd I can see his limbs under the shell if i shine a light. I can also just barely make out his top horn from above below the pupal skin. If that's the case, he may be only a matter of hours away from eclosion.
  3. Yesterday
  4. Mantisfan101

    Hibernation questions for D. Tityus

    Thanks again for the speedy responses! His pupa is at the poin when the eyes and mouthparts are dark amd I can see his limbs under the shell if i shine a light. I can also just barely make out his top horn from above below the pupal skin.
  5. Goliathus

    Hibernation questions for D. Tityus

    Ah, thanks! So hibernation isn’t necessary for them to lay eggs, got it. However, I have 3 other male larvae that are nowhere near pupating and 1 male pupa that should emerge in a few weeks, should I hibernate he female just so that the others can catch up? Thanks! If you have a male that's still several weeks from eclosion, keep in mind that it's likely to be a couple of months (at minimum) before he actually emerges from his cell, and becomes active and ready to mate. Although tityus females can live for months, they should be mated within 60 days of becoming active, and ideally, within the first several weeks after they emerge from their cells. So, yes, if you can get the female to hibernate until you have a male become active, that would be best. If your males are all likely to emerge too late to mate with the female, you might check with bugsincyberspace to see if they have any adult males in stock. Also, do the pupal chambers need to stored horizontally or vertically for the adults to properly emerge? Thanks once again! They should be kept in the original orientation in which they were built by the larvae. Many beetles construct their pupal cells at an incline that puts the head end somewhat higher than the abdomen, and even if the incline is rather subtle, it's important to maintain this if the cells are moved.
  6. Mantisfan101

    Hibernation questions for D. Tityus

    Also, do the pupal chambers need to stored horizontally or vertically for the adults to properly emerge? Thanks once again!
  7. Last week
  8. Mantisfan101

    Hibernation questions for D. Tityus

    Ah, thanks! So hibernation isn’t necessary for them to lay eggs, got it. However, I have 3 other male larvae that are nowhere near pupating and 1 male pupa that should emerge in a few weeks, should I hibernate he female just so that the others can catch up? Thanks!
  9. Goliathus

    Hibernation questions for D. Tityus

    I've been keeping a continuous culture of tityus for at least 15 years, and have never hibernated them. I keep them between 70-77 F. year-round. They're now completely out of sync with the emergence time of the wild population, and it's not unusual for them to emerge and breed right in the middle of winter. If the beetles are active and feeding, they're ready to breed, regardless of the time of year. Incidentally, in Florida (peninsular FL, at least), tityus doesn't hibernate, since the climate is mild year-round. This is also why bears in zoos don't hibernate - it's simply not necessary. Hibernation is just a way to conserve energy during times when the weather isn't ideal, and food would be scarce. If an animal doesn't need to hibernate, it won't.
  10. Mantisfan101

    Hibernation questions for D. Tityus

    Thank you, but she emerged during the middle of winter. Also I have heard that hibernating helps mature the female’s ovaries and eggs, is this true?
  11. JKim

    Hibernation questions for D. Tityus

    Unless the female emerged in a late summer to early spring, hibernation is not required. Also, if you keep it indoor, such thing is not even necessary as indoor temperature is high enough to avoid hibernation. Egg laying does not require hibernation whatsoever.
  12. Is hibernation reauired for females to lay eggs? What’s the temperature range that they should be kept at and how long should I let my female D. Tityus hibernate?
  13. No, I haven't considered them. I'll have to look into it. Thanks.
  14. robot

    How to Find Beetles

    The best way to find the beetles you're looking for is to shine a mercury vapor (MV) light on a sheet in the woods. The beetles, along with moths, will land on the sheet. You'll need a generator to power the light. If you don't want to spend money on a light rig, look for brightly lit gas stations (or other buildings) that are in rural areas. In the past, most of them had MV lights that attracted lots of insects. Unfortunately most have switched to LED lights, which don't attract much of anything. If you are able to find a building that still has MV lights, check it frequently. Some nights will be very good, others not so good. I have collected lots of the species you mentioned by gas-station hopping.
  15. Earlier
  16. Hisserdude

    Howdy ya'll! (I never actually say that)

    Welcome the the forum, hope you enjoy it here!
  17. Hisserdude

    Beetle care & husbandry websites

    Thank you for reading, I'll definitely be writing some more caresheets for species I've bred successfully!
  18. davehuth

    Osmoderma advice?

    I thought I'd update how things are going with my Osmoderma, because this is so far a very successful project. A few months after my previous post, I summarized my summer experience over on Arachnobaords, if you'd like to see some more pictures: http://arachnoboards.com/threads/my-osmoderma-adventure.310138/ In the late fall, just like @Goliathus said I could expect, a lot of L2 larvae burrowed down to the bottom of the enclosure and I could see them in diapause against the plastic. They don't move, but squirm a bit if i tap the plastic, so they seem to simply be waiting for Spring. How they know it's winter is a mystery, as the lights and temperature in my bug room are all artificial and unchanging. This month (March) a couple more adults have begun to emerge from the surface. They're enjoying apples and bananas, and I'm setting up a new enclosure with fresh substrate for my second generation. All these larvae were wild caught, so I haven't technically "captive bred" them yet. But if these new adults lay eggs, I guess I'll be rolling! I really appreciate the advice I've had here, both in the forum and through private messages. Thanks very much!
  19. davehuth

    Beetle care & husbandry websites

    Great information, thanks for gathering it together and sharing. And @Hisserdude, I'm really enjoying your caresheets project. Keep it up :-) !
  20. Hisserdude

    Beetle care & husbandry websites

    In the spirit of sharing husbandry related websites, just thought I'd mention I've started a dedicated blog to caresheets here, and there are a few beetle ones up currently, might be more in the future!
  21. Hisserdude

    G'day from S.A.

    Welcome to the forum! NIIIIIIICE, those are either a Helea species, or something very closely related... They are indeed called Piedish beetles over in Australia, and are similar in appearance to the US Piedish beetles, Embaphion spp, (and both are Tenebrionids). They likely have similar care to Embaphion, I wrote a caresheet for that genus here if you are interested, (most desert dwelling Tenebs can be cared for in the same manner). (On a side note, ever see any interesting scrub roaches in your area? )
  22. I've been seeing a lot of posts in breeder groups lately of people showing off their trilobite beetles, those posts usually get a ton of likes and comments from jealous hobbyists who want some themselves. Now a lot of people seem to think they are very difficult to keep in captivity, but the truth is that they are nearly IMPOSSIBLE to keep alive long term, and breeding them is almost certainly out of the picture for the average hobbyist. If anyone here is thinking of getting their own trilobite beetles, or wants to learn more about why they are such horrible captives, please read the following post: https://invertebratedude.blogspot.com/2019/03/my-opinion-trilobite-beetles.html
  23. JKim

    How to hibernate

    Keep the beetles in between 40 - 60˚F. If the temperature goes up and low, and not stabilize, the beetles won't go hibernate. Don't go any lower than 40. It may freeze to death. You must keep them in a container about 32 oz or larger with full substrate in the container.
  24. Bugboy3092

    Howdy ya'll! (I never actually say that)

    Howdy to you too! Have you ever considered darkling beetles for your endeavors? Texas (and the west in general) is a great place for our largest species (mainly eleodes species).
  25. The Mantis Menagerie

    Beetle care & husbandry websites

    I have come across most of these sites before, and I agree they are good resources. The Goliathus manual could be improved, but it seems okay.
  26. I came across these information packed sites recently and wanted to share. Enjoy! http://www.naturalworlds.org/scarabaeidae/manual/Scarabaeidae_breeding_1.htm http://www.naturalworlds.org/scarabaeidae/manual/hercules/Dynastes_hercules_breeding_1.htm http://www.naturalworlds.org/goliathus/manual/Goliathus_breeding_1.htm http://www.mars.dti.ne.jp/~k-sugano/bakamono_web/kabuto/english.htm https://www.earthlife.net/insects/megasoma.html https://www.earthlife.net/insects/gb-care.html http://www.uky.edu/Ag/CritterFiles/casefile/insects/beetles/hercules/rearing/rearing.htm
  27. The Mantis Menagerie

    How to hibernate

    I think it would be fine for D. tityus. Unfortunately, I have no experience with adult D. tityus (although not from lack of trying), but it has worked for my Alaus oculatus adults.
  28. Mantisfan101

    How to hibernate

    I was thinking the same but it seemed a bit too cold, would it be safe for all the other produce and stuff? But then again I have my test tube setup with my camponotus chromaiodes colonies in there for at least 3 months by now and they’re doing fine...
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