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  2. Goliathus

    Geotrupes sp. in captivity?

    Oxysternon is another beautifully colored genus of Neotropical dung beetles. They're closely related to Phanaeus. Some photos -
  3. davehuth

    Greetings from Florida!

    Welcome! I also haven’t been active here long but I’ve found it to be a treasure trove of helpful information and encouragement. I’ve met some really interesting people and purchased or traded for some groovy beetles. Cheers!
  4. atotalnoob

    Greetings from Florida!

    Hello, I live in Florida and have an interest in beetles. I really love stags and rhinos. I do not own any beetles, but I'd love to bulk up my knowledge on them before I decide on getting one. This forum looks awesome, and I think it will help foster a successful hobby for me.
  5. I believe the 3rd edition is a reformatted 2nd edition.
  6. Last week
  7. Ratmosphere

    Geotrupes sp. in captivity?

    Really an amazing looking species!
  8. Goliathus

    Geotrupes sp. in captivity?

    Not a geotrupid, but I've always thought it might be quite worthwhile to try breeding the giant metallic blue phanaeine Coprophanaeus (=Megaphanaeus) lancifer from South America, if an opportunity ever turned up for some hobbyist to do so. It's one of the largest dung beetles (the size of a golf ball) found in the Americas, and interestingly, instead of feeding on dung like most other Phanaeini, they're carrion eaters. They're incredibly strong for their size, and I've heard that a pair of these beetles can actually bury a pig carcass, over a period of several days! Another unusual characteristic is that both sexes have horns.
  9. Ratmosphere

    Geotrupes sp. in captivity?

    Imagine using dog or human feces just to breed a beetle... reminds me of people keeping leeches and letting them feed on their arms etc.
  10. Beetle-Experience

    Geotrupes sp. in captivity?

    Davehuth, I have worked with a similar species here (Louisiana). If you use cow or horse dung it really doesn't smell for very long (dry dung would not work well). You could also try banana slices if you can't manage dung - but just for keeping adults alive, they will not lay eggs on banana. When I was working on the dung beetle book, I kept large plastic breeding totes in a spare bathroom and never noticed the smell in any other room. I DO NOT suggest using human or dog. Both work great for collecting in the field but would not be pleasant to work with in captivity. I could make a list of reasons why you shouldn't use these but you can probably already figure out most of the list. If you are looking to breed them, you would need rather deep substrate (just dirt is fine in this case), Place dung on the surface and replace when it is gone. Of the geotrupids that use dung for egg laying (like the species in your photo; many other geotrupids do not use dung) - they are paracoprids (tunnelers), not endocoprids as JKim suggested. Yours might be Geotrupes blackburnii, or a closely relates species. Good Luck! Steven
  11. Just a brief update-- For whatever reason, I've stopped finding these in the wild the last couple weeks (though they're very cryptic as you can see in the photo below, which contains 3 individuals...) I've divided the enclosure into 2 halves. 1. a slightly damp side of leaf litter, bark, decomposing wood, and broken chunks of a variety of fungus. 2. And a more dry side of just a single large bracket mushroom. I've tried supplemental foods: they aren't interested in carrot or dog kibble, but they give some attention to apple. I'll try grains next. They'll gnaw on multiple kinds of fungal growth. Their behavior is puzzling. They disappear for days at a time in the leaves and wood, and then return to the bracket mushroom to feed in the open. In the past week they've started energetically burrowing into the bracket for the first time, rather than scraping along the outer surface. I haven't observed mating (there are 7 unsexed individuals in my group) or anything resembling egg laying. But it's not easy to track what they're doing when they disappear into the various crevices and crannies of the enclosure. So, they remain alive, active, and mysterious.
  12. The Mantis Menagerie

    Pelidnota punctata

    I just did it, and I had one in about five minutes. That was the only one, though.
  13. JKim

    Pelidnota punctata

    the grapevines where I mostly collect these beetles were definitely different species from the harvested on in my backyard long time ago. But that didn't matter. I fed captured adults with the one at my backyard. So, probably, no, it does not matter.
  14. davehuth

    Pelidnota punctata

    Thanks for sharing your advice and experience. There are areas in my town where wild grape vine grows in large patches and chokes out trees. I also have a neighbor who cultivates horticultural juicing grapes on his property. I know wild and cultivated are different species. Is one better than another for this beetle?
  15. JKim

    Pelidnota punctata

    One tip I can give you is to light up (if you are doing light trapping) at the forest where it actually has grapevines. There is no other reason why they are called as "Grapevine beetles." They love feeding on grapevine.
  16. JKim

    Checking on my stag

    He is upside down to dry a ventral side of abdomen (belly). No worry, as long as he is inside the pupal cell, and not out in plain ground. If he is inside the pupal cell, he will be able to grab a wall and lift himself up. Try not to touch for next couple days. L. elaphus is not known to die out of shock like some exotic species, though it is best to keep it alone for a week or two since they emerged out of pupa.
  17. Dak.the.bug

    Checking on my stag

    Hey all! My male L.elaphus emerged from its pupa on July 5th, when can I dump the cup to check on the little Guy? He is upside down so I want to make sure he is okay.
  18. davehuth

    Pelidnota punctata

    I’m getting started at the right time I guess! I’ll let you know if I draw any out of the shadows. It would be the first BugGuide submission from my county 🙂
  19. JKim

    Pelidnota punctata

    Yes, these are F2 larvae. I collected a pair two years ago, and bred some larvae. They became adult beetles, and laid another batch of eggs. AND I actually collected a handful this year, so I added couple alive ones in the same container.. So I'm guessing they are all mixed up. I just looked up on BugGuide, and most recent records indicate P. punctata in New York are mostly active in July to August. In Louisiana, P. punctata are found in May to early July for the most, and still be found couple latter months.
  20. davehuth

    Geotrupes sp. in captivity?

    Oh, I see those photos are examples of tropical Thai Geotrupidae.
  21. davehuth

    Geotrupes sp. in captivity?

    !!!! I’m constantly amazed by the diversity of your local taxa. Those iridescent Geotrupes are blowing my mind. I’ve been trying and trying to resist bringing feces into my bug room (I like being married to my patient spouse!) but these cool scarabs are testing my resolve. I also don’t have a reliable source, other than deer scat and the occasional horse ridden past my driveway Im curious about the necessary “quality” of scat. If I use manure that’s dried and aged for a bit (to reduce the ripe odor of fresh stuff), would that contain sufficient nutrition for these beetles and their larvae?
  22. davehuth

    Pelidnota punctata

    Wow!! Are you captive breeding these? This is one of the species motivating me to try my hand at more serious light trapping this season. BugGuide lists Pelidnota punctata for my state (NY), but I’ve never seen it. I’m always on the prowl! 😄
  23. JKim

    Pelidnota punctata

    An image of L1-L2 larvae of Pelidnota punctata
  24. JKim

    Geotrupes sp. in captivity?

    If what you are interested in is breeding (reproduction), then you will need to feed animal feces or your own works fine too. (I'm serious! ). If not, just keep them on substrate, spray water lightly, and nothing much can be done. They feed on animal feces, and I believe they lay eggs under piles of animal feces, as some other dung beetles do. (not a brood ball).
  25. Goliathus

    Geotrupes sp. in captivity?

    I don't know much about Geotrupidae, but I've occasionally found blue, gold or black species of Geotrupes in my local area. As with other beetle families, there are some considerably larger, even more impressive ones in the tropics, such as Enoplotrupes sharpi (Thailand) -
  26. Garin

    Strategus aloeus male pupa plates

    Wow, great photos!
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