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  1. Yesterday
  2. Bugboy3092

    Hi from MN

    Welcome! While you won’t find any exotic species publicly here, many people supply the other species!
  3. Bugboy3092

    ID help- eastern Hercules beetle?

    The oils on your hands won’t harm the grub (if anything they’d probably add to the wax layers on the skin of the larva, which is good), handling related deaths are mainly due to the stress of being dug up too often. It’s definitely an eastern Hercules, almost all stag beetle grubs have orange heads, whereas most rhino beetles have dark brown heads (although I believe strategus May have orangish heads too). Definitely toss the cotton ball, it’ll do more harm than good if the grub ingests it (I haven’t heard of it before, but I bet it’s possible a grub could “choke” on cotton). Also, how deep is that substrate? A healthy grub should almost never be seen on the surface, and the sub should be at least 4 inches deep.
  4. Last week
  5. Tylt33

    Hi from MN

    Welcome!
  6. PowerHobo

    ID help- eastern Hercules beetle?

    The only thing I might be interested in seeing is it’s anal slit. I believe North Carolina also has Lucanus elaphus, which look very similar (to me) as larvae except for the end portion of their abdomen and anal slit. You can toss that cotton ball. The larva will get all the moisture it needs from investing the humid soil and rotten wood. Also, you’re in the clear to handle it gently, just try to limit the frequency with which you do so. A lot of us check our larvae only once a month or more.
  7. PowerHobo

    Hello from North Carolina

    Welcome to the forum!
  8. Anacimas

    Hug me.

    Hi Jacob, Don't forget to upload a video, so forum members can share your enjoyment!
  9. jaccob

    Hug me.

    I'd gladly hug him. He looks like he's holding his arms out for a hug.
  10. jaccob

    ID help- eastern Hercules beetle?

    I exceeded maximum file size by adding more than 1 picture, so here's another. It was eating the leaf when I took this one.
  11. I'm sorry these aren't the best pictures and don't show the whole body, but they're the best I could get without handling the larva and I've heard the oils on my skin could damage it so I've not touched the larva at all if I can help it. I found this under a log while collecting insects for my entomology class and I wasn't sure what it was especially because of its size (I'd guess it's at least a couple inches long) and I'd never seen a grub that big before, so I put it in a vial with some soil and showed it to my professor. As far as he can tell it's likely an eastern Hercules beetle. If it helps more, I'm in Western North Carolina up in the mountains. I found it about two weeks ago. Since finding it, I've been keeping it in a plastic container with some soil, a wet cotton ball for water, and decaying tree bark I pull off pretty soft tree stumps that it's been eating a lot of. I figure since it's definitely been eating the bark it must be pretty good. I just wanted some other opinions on what it is and sorry I couldn't get a more full body picture without handling it. I've been trying to minimize how often I touch it.
  12. I'm a junior general bio major who's currently enrolled in entomology and has found myself with a beetle larva I found while working on my bug collection for entomology since my professor said it should be fairly easy and pretty fun to raise it and see what it ends up bring, so I was told this site was a good place to ask questions about my larva and how to care for it.
  13. Bugboy3092

    ESA conference 2018

    It’s that time again when ESA rolls around, anyone else going to the conference in Vancouver??? I swear a couple of people here went last year, but I didn’t know that in time, so anyone else gonna be there?
  14. Schledog

    Hi from MN

    Hi, my name is Owen and I’m not new to the beetle hobby or beetle forum (long time lurker) but I finally set up an account. I have one rough death feigning beetle, two blue death feigning beetles, and an Axolotl. My favourite beetle exotic beetle is Mecyrrhina torqata ugandis but I also LOVE desert darklings and zopheridae. Anyway I’m really excited to finally have an account
  15. AlexW

    Hello from ny

    Welcome
  16. AlexW

    Deilelater physoderus

    Very little seems to be scientifically known of its biology but since it is a close relative of Pyrophorus care is probably very similar. Hisserdude has a caresheet for Pyrophorus on his blog.
  17. Staples

    Larvae ID

    It is approximately 2 inches long.
  18. Staples

    Larvae ID

    Having trouble loading photos but this is one of the larveas I found under a rotten log this past summer. I'm keeping it in a incubator at 77° in a jar with compressed shredded rotten wood. Seems to be growing fast and eating the wood fine. I've been feeding it one high profile dry dog food pellet every two days. Also found a bunch of smaller stag beetle larvea in the same area that already pupated. Any help iding it would be appreciated.
  19. Staples

    Hello from ny

    Me and my kids found some grubs under a log while hiking in the woods this past summer. So now I have a bunch of small stag beetles and some unknown beetle larvea in my incubator. I've been trying to learn more about my local beetle spieces and it keeps getting more interesting. Seems to be a fairly inexpensive hobby that doesn't take up much room.
  20. darktheumbreon

    State of the Hobby(TM)

    Is there any hobbyist that is known, in the states, that is breeding beetles to record sizes? Like D. tityus, D. grantii, or L. elephas for example of upwards of 80cm? It seems like the dedication found in Asia is not very common here for beetles as they are very very niche.
  21. PowerHobo

    Hello from Ohio!

    Welcome to the forum, Jillian!
  22. a.gigas

    Hello from Ohio!

    Hello beetlers, My name is Jillian, and I am a young hobbyist and bug enthusiast. My hobbies include playing the saxophone, spending time with my birds, keeping bugs, and skiing =]. I am a veterinary major with a minor in entomology. Can't wait to meet you all.
  23. The Mantis Menagerie

    BDFB Larva starting to Pupate

    I think Zophobas morio is a little bit complex to raise since they usually do not pupate in the presence of other larvae. Mealworms, on the other hand, can be raised by sticking them in a bin with some oats and leaving them for a couple months.
  24. Beetle-Experience

    State of the Hobby(TM)

    This was the response from USDA/APHIS/PPQ regarding the California Stag Beetle issue: April 20, 2016: "I have seen the California documents and they are misleading." "The California permitting information only applies to movement within California of material already in California. The USDA has jurisdiction over "plant pests" crossing state lines. The USDA does not regulate movement of plant pests established in a state and moved within the same state unless there is a Federal Quarantine."
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