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  1. Last week
  2. Hi everyone, I'm Eli from the UK. I got into keeping and breeding beetles as a hobby around a year ago, it's becoming more an obsession as time goes on. Currently I'm breeding (with varying success) : Mecynorrhina torquata ugandensis Dorcus Titanus (typhon) Pyrochroa serraticornis (?) zophobas morio pachnoda marginata stephanorrhina guttata allomyrina dichotoma And hope to expand my collection as time allows.
  3. PowerHobo

    Hi from the UK!

    Lol I like it! I can't tell me BDFBs apart enough to name them. Welcome to the forum!
  4. PowerHobo

    Visitor on my patio

    That's funny! I've never received any nibbles from my BDFBs. Then again none of my BDFBs have the sense of self-preservation to feign death, either. 😂
  5. Earlier
  6. arizonablue

    Visitor on my patio

    I picked it up by the thorax, the little spikes actually make it easy to grab. Then I just set it down on my hand. None of the cactus longhorns I had ever bit me. The only beetles that have ever nipped me have all been blue death-feigners.
  7. Mantisfan101

    Visitor on my patio

    How’d you pick it up without gloves?! I found a tile horned prionus at my porch light and it acted like my thumb was a huge sausage!
  8. BeetleMum

    Hi from the UK!

    Hi everyone! I'm Tiff and I live on a small Island in the South of the UK. I recently bought 4 blue death feigning beetles as I fell in love with them! I did give them each a name, but have resorted to calling them all 'Beetle Bob!'
  9. PowerHobo

    Hello!

    Welcome to the forum!
  10. Ratmosphere

    Hello!

    Welcome and congratulations on that awesome find!
  11. This books saved my life and my beetles multiple times and now I am in the hunt to try and collect all of Orin’s books. 200/10 if you ask me, don’t get relictant because of the price tag, with the information provided it’s a buy that I will not be regretting anytime soon.
  12. Mantisfan101

    ID help- eastern Hercules beetle?

    It looks like a D. Tityus to me, since lucanida tend to have lighter head capsules.
  13. Schledog

    Hello!

    Welcome to the forum! Bugs in cyberspace has mantids, n. Amearicanus, and lucanus elaphus for sale on their website right now and if you make a post in the for sale area I’m sure you could find some other creatures on your list!
  14. Mantisfan101

    Hello!

    Hello! Found my first D. Tityus female near my house a few aummers ago and now I have 5 male and 1 female grub. They are all at L3 and are growing pretty slowly. I am currentl trying to find L. elaphus, L. capreolus, D. Parallelus, C. Nitida, and O. Eremicoa along with some other invertebrates. I also have a hamdful of grapevine beetle larvae I collected from another female I caught nearby. I also keep fish and ants as well. Other invertebrates I am looking for are praying mantids, giant silk moths, N. americanus, Trachymyrmex septentrionalis, and M. Blatchleyi or any Maryland- native stick insect. I also recently found out about the legalization of Goliath beetles in USA and I am now super hyped amd can’t wait for them to get established in the hobby! Thanks for everyone in this entire beetle community and it is such a pleasure to be here!
  15. JosephDiaz

    Visitor on my patio

    Nice one!
  16. JosephDiaz

    Hello from Ohio!

    Welcome to this board!!
  17. JosephDiaz

    Hi from MN

    hello!! Welcome to this board!
  18. AlexW

    Strategus Antaeus cannibalistic?

    Even pentatomids and caterpillars will cannibalize when starving or crowded, and almost all generalist herbivores will eat corpses even if healthy.
  19. AlexW

    Beetle Identifications

    Agreed with Bugboy (yes, it's spelled correctly). Penthe is so poorly studied that no online research exists on their biology; however, putting them in a box with fungi and moisture levels similar to those in their habitat is probably enough. Keep in mind that many large fungus beetles are specialist feeders and may possibly become unhealthy or experience larval deaths if forced to feed on non-preferred species for long periods. You may wish to occasionally offer beetle jellies or fruits as supplemental foods though; Penthe have been known to eat it in captivity
  20. AlexW

    Alobates pensylvanica care?

    One of my friends fed an Alobates adult a scarab grub. Despite being a slow, vulnerable animal, the grub was unharmed; one would expect grubs to be a favorite of predatory slow-moving forest beetles (after all, lucanids enjoy chewing them up)
  21. Bugboy3092

    Beetle Identifications

    The first one is definitely alobates, the second one appears to be penthe pimelia (I think that’s how it’s spelled).
  22. Bugboy3092

    Alobates pensylvanica care?

    Maybe, I guess good luck importing eastern termites lol (that’s the only thing I could possibly imagine them preying upon, they just seem way too soft)
  23. Bugboy3092

    Beetles in Maine

    It mainly depends on the species you’re looking for. Elaphus are limited to the southern parts of the range (supposedly they go no further than New York, and likely are extremely hard to find that far north, while you can find dozens per day down here) while capreolus are common up into Connecticut (and I believe adjacent Canada).
  24. Hisserdude

    Alobates pensylvanica care?

    Supposedly they are predatory but I couldn't get my adults nor my larvae to accept any prey items I offered them in captivity. Perhaps they just have very specific tastes when it comes to what invertebrates they'll prey on...
  25. Bugboy3092

    Alobates pensylvanica care?

    I’ve read that both life stages are predatory, likely on termites? I’ve found larvae before, and only in moist logs with plenty of other life inside
  26. Hisserdude

    Alobates pensylvanica care?

    I was able to get adults to oviposit when kept in an enclosure with lots of bark and a moist substrate of crushed, rotten hardwood, but unfortunately I was never able to rear any larvae to adulthood, they all died off one by one. I don't know if it was cannibalism, an improper diet, improper humidity levels, or just an improper setup, (I think they may need to bore into large chunks of wood rather than live in a mix of pre-crushed substrate). The adults lived for about a year, seems like they barely ate grain based foods at all, almost looked like they were gnawing on the bark, perhaps feedings on lichens or mosses? Overall they were not an easy species to keep or breed, I think adults probably have a specific diet of lichens, mosses and fungi in the wild, and larvae probably need to be kept isolated in large, moist pieces of rotten wood, yet they do seem to need access to protein to survive.
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