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  1. Last week
  2. arizonablue

    My First Scarab Pupae!

    Nice! I raised these guys but I never opened one of the cells for fear of hurting it, so I never got to see what they look like. Thanks for posting the photos, that's really cool! (And as a note, I never had a single one die after pupating, so if you've got them this far you're doing great and you should have a handful of little beetles soon!)
  3. Garin

    My First Scarab Pupae!

    Congratulations! Things are turning around for you as expected!
  4. It's been no secret that I am a killer of larvae. I don't want to be, I just am. I'm getting better (I think). So, basically, finally seeing successful pupation (especially after a truly crappy week) is a big deal for me, and I am probably disproportionately excited. 😁 I came into the office with the intention of mixing some oak flake in with my G caseyi substrate, since it was entirely organic compost and some leaves. I thought they had about 2 months to go before pupation, and I also thought that some had died because they were rather hard to find when I poked around in the sub a couple weeks ago, but I found 7 neat little pupal cells! In fact, I totally forgot that Peter sent me an extra larvae, and as I was moving the sub back into their container, I found (and broke) an 8th. I dumped it out just to get a look since I figured I may have killed it anyway, but the pupa seems ok! Even gave me a little abdomen wiggle. About 3/5 of the pupal cell is intact, so I went ahead and put it back inside, then placed the cell on top of the substrate, and placed a moist (ran under water then thoroughly wrung out) paper towel over it with a bit of an air gap so the paper towel isn't directly contacting the pupal cell, trying to make a little humid micro-climate. If anyone has a better/safer way to do this, I would love to hear it!
  5. Garin

    Moneilema gigas (cactus longhorn)

    In Arizona, I have found them pretty much anytime. Day, night, etc. Because each time I went the weather and conditions were slightly different it's hard for me to say for sure whether I felt a certain time was better than the other. I think night is a little better but it's much easier to collect them when it's day light so you end up being more productive, if that makes sense. Walking around with a flash light among lots of cholla cactus is definitely not as easy as the daytime. There is also lots of it on the ground so make sure you are wearing boots. Those nasty thorns will go right through soft covered shoes. Of course, good long tweezers is a must. In their more active times, you will find more mating pairs. During the day, they will often be more toward the center of the cholla or the under branches as opposed to right on top. I don't think they submerge under the soil but stay on the cactus all the time, so it's just a matter of looking a little bit harder when they are less active. Oh, you probably know this but you can feed them prickly pear cactus even though you will often them on Cholla (you will also find them on prickly pear in the same location but I generally find them on Cholla more often). Prickly pear is much easier to handle. If you are out in the field and don't have access to prickly pear, you can feed them the little round flower buds that are at the tips of the cholla (see below picture). You can find some of these flower buds with no thorns on them and they are easy to just pick off with your hand. Great way to gather food for them without spiking yourself to death, haha.
  6. Bugboy3092

    Moneilema gigas (cactus longhorn)

    Welp, that’s probably why you haven’t found many. These guys are mostly active, and can be found standing on top of the cactus, at dusk and night. At least in New Mexico, they seem to be quite plentiful if you look at the right time (we’re going there in a week, and I plan to hunt for them heavily as we travel).
  7. piggy145

    Moneilema gigas (cactus longhorn)

    That's amazing how you got one, I haven't been put out there looking but i do hope to find some before they are all gone.
  8. PowerHobo

    Carnivorous Plants

    I've always loved pitchers and VFT plants, but have never kept any. I've gathered that the carnivorous plant hobby seems to be much like the US coleoptera hobby (lots of "experts" with conflicting methods). Was just wondering if anyone knows of any good resources or communities.
  9. Earlier
  10. Hey there, Just wanted to say hello. I collect all types of Wasps and Beetles, I have multiple Enclosures built ! Right now I'm looking to buy the following for separate enclosures i've built If anyone has leads?!?1 - Broad Neck Stump Borer - Sawyer or long horns - Predator beetles - Tiger beetles - Devils Coach Horse - Stags let me know!
  11. Dubia4life

    Dung Beetle questions

    Thanks for this! I recently read about similar (possible the same) trapping methods in Orin's Ultimate Guide. Sounds very similar to a homemade minnow trap.
  12. arizonablue

    Moneilema gigas (cactus longhorn)

    I've been looking in the mornings and late afternoons, although the guy I got this one from says he sees them most reliably in the mornings.
  13. Bugboy3092

    Moneilema gigas (cactus longhorn)

    Im heading to New Mexico soon and plan to capture some there, are you mainly searching at day or at night?
  14. All About Arthropods

    Moneilema gigas (cactus longhorn)

    Marvelous!!! It is probably one of the greatest mysteries to man (or at least myself) why these have not been established in culture yet! I'll be crossing my fingers that yours is a female and that if so, she gives you many eggs.
  15. arizonablue

    Moneilema gigas (cactus longhorn)

    After a lot of luckless searching for these beetles, someone who found one in their yard contacted me and I went to pick it up. Please meet my first cactus longhorn beetle! It's bigger than I was expecting, and very curious and docile. I was attempting to take some photos of it with my decent camera, but it much preferred to walk all over me instead of sitting pretty on a piece of cholla, so I got a quick snap with my phone instead.
  16. PowerHobo

    Embaphion muricatum Questions

    Aggressive was definitely the wrong word. Hyper-defensive is more accurate. They spray with almost no provocation, and half the time I smell them before I actually see them.
  17. AlexW

    Embaphion muricatum Questions

    Aggressive? I have never heard of darklings actually running towards their perceived threats. Quite odd
  18. Garin

    Pasimachus californicus

    Cool beetles, I saw quite a few this year on my last trip to southern AZ. I finally found one with the green metallic outline. I have never tried breeding them, keep us posted.
  19. arizonablue

    Pasimachus californicus

    Got a pair of these today - one is a bit smaller than the other, so I think there's a male and a female, although I'm not certain. I was a little worried they might nip me with those big jaws, but they seem very docile.
  20. STELLAR

    Hello from Utah!

    How do I join?
  21. Goliathus

    Unidentified Larva

    It's the larva of a cetoniine scarab of some kind - possibly Osmoderma eremicola or O. scabra.
  22. STELLAR

    Unidentified Larva

    I dont believe it tends to dig or walk upside down.
  23. Goliathus

    Unidentified Larva

    Most likely either a melolonthine ("June" beetle) or ruteline (Shining leaf chafer) larva - only way to know for sure would be to raise it to adult. I suspect that it's probably the larva of a melolonthine.
  24. Check it out https://imgur.com/a/SRlxYwZ
  25. STELLAR

    Unidentified Larva

    Heres a small larva I found today. Any idea what it is? https://imgur.com/a/VrQun4v
  26. All About Arthropods

    Embaphion muricatum Questions

    No problem. Yea, definitely not BDF beetle type lifespans, but still on the longer side compared to some of the other inverts in the hobby. Fair enough; I like culturing everything I have because it lets me witness the change in each species as they grow, gives me pretty much an endless supply of each species, leaves me with a surplus that I can either trade or sell away, and, in the relatively unlikely scenario that a species goes extinct in the wild, it will still be preserved in captivity. I do understand that it takes more work, but that's the way I look at it.
  27. PowerHobo

    Embaphion muricatum Questions

    Thank you for the info. I can't do roaches. I fully understand the diversity and that only a few are invasive pest species, but too many bad experiences in my low-rent apartment-living days have left me with a strong distaste. Hopefully I'll be over it some day, because I'm aware it's silly. I can't even keep bark mantids because they look too much like their roach cousins. Thank you for the tip. There was a ton of answers to my questions in his caresheet. My issue with local darklings is that the only ones I regularly see are these aggressive, highly stinky a-holes, and aren't exactly something I want in an enclosed space. Beyond that the only good place I know of that I've seen an abundance of beetles is a national park, so collection is illegal. Thanks for the link! Super helpful. I actually didn't know they lived that long as adults. The adult longevity is part of what was making me like at BDF beetles. I'm really not interested in culturing them, as I've already experienced that with Z morio, and frankly it took some of the fun out of having them for me.
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