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  1. Past hour
  2. MasterOogway

    Chrysina beyeri

    Right? Would there be any issues keeping even L1's in bin with a clay layer underneath the flake/leaf litter mix? I'm going to be out on paternity leave for a while after our C. gloriosa come in and am trying to cut back on the amount of work the rest of the staff will have to do while I'm gone. Was thinking I'll just set up the bins with the clay layer already in so they won't have to worry about it. I couldn't really think of anything tragic that would happen, but I've been surprised before....
  3. Today
  4. I was just wondering if anyone has ever kept cucujus clavipes. If so what are some tips on keeping them?
  5. Yesterday
  6. Goliathus

    Buddleia davidii

    Yes - they do give off a very noticeable smell, similar to lilac (Syringa spp.). Undoubtedly, this is why they attract butterflies so strongly. Some more photos of my dwarf Buddleia (cultivar ID: Buddleia x 'SMNBDL' ppaf), which is starting to flower more now. Interestingly, although it's currently my smallest plant, it has the largest blooms.
  7. Hydrophilus

    Iron clad beetle care

    Verolazico, did you have any luck keeping them?
  8. Ratmosphere

    Lucanus placidus Say, 1825 - Male

    Such a cool species! Awesome share.
  9. Ratmosphere

    Buddleia davidii

    Bet they smell real nice.
  10. Ratmosphere

    Chrysina beyeri

    Love the legs on these!
  11. Last week
  12. Goliathus

    Chrysina beyeri

    Since gloriosa is smaller than beyeri, I'm sure you could keep at least 25 or maybe even 30 larvae together in something the size of a half-filled, 10 gal. aquarium without having them get in each other's way when they are ready to build pupal cells. I've always just been careful not to crowd beetle larvae (of any species) too much. Chrysina larvae don't have cannibalistic tendencies, and won't bother each other even when kept at rather high densities - there just needs to be plenty of room for them to space themselves apart when the time comes to build cells, and not all of them will do so at the same time; rather, a few will do so early on, followed by the majority some time after, and then finally the last few.
  13. MasterOogway

    Chrysina beyeri

    You guys rock. Thanks for the info and the thread link. 😍
  14. Goliathus

    Chrysina beyeri

    The time period between pupation and emergence doesn't seem to be very long - it's the larva's pre-pupal, winter diapause that takes some months. It's difficult to know the exact amount of time involved with the various stages in this and other Chrysina species though, since they often construct fully enclosed cells, or, even if they do leave a small "window" into the cell through which they can be observed, the eventual pupa becomes completely obscured by the stretched larval skin that forms a loose envelope around it after the molt. The larvae are quite easy to rear on the same type of decayed hardwood substrate as is used for most Dynastinae and Cetoniinae. The key factor for success with Chrysina is to make sure that once the larvae start reaching full size and are beginning to turn from white to pale yellow, they are provided with a layer of clay soil at the bottom of their container, in which they will build pupal cells. See the following post for more info - http://beetleforum.net/topic/3899-chrysina-beyeri-gloriosa/ You can either keep each larva individually in a 16 oz container, as shown in the above link, or, 20 to 25 larvae as a group in a 10 gal. aquarium or equivalent-sized plastic box.
  15. JKim

    Chrysina beyeri

    @MasterOogway Chrysina gloriosa is very easy species. NO WORRY AT ALL!! Adults feed on fresh juniper leaves, and they love it! they lay A LOT of eggs. Survival rates are also high. Use regular substrate, nothing special, no additional food sources required. VERY EASY species. Takes less than a year to emerge starting from eggs.
  16. MasterOogway

    Chrysina beyeri

    So pretty! I have some C. gloriosa on the way, will be my first time working with this genus. Any advice?
  17. davehuth

    Chrysina beyeri

    Congratulations! Is this the first you’ve managed to successfully rear all the way to adult? About how long did it take from pupation to emergence?
  18. Hisserdude

    Alaus lusciosus

    Alaus grubs aren't too difficult to rear or feed, they just require fresh invertebrate prey, you can bury smashed bits of mealworms or roaches for smaller instars, and can move on to live prey for larger ones. Coconut fiber seems to work fine for a substrate, but when it comes time to pupate, they'll seek out large pieces of dead wood to bore into, (doesn't have to be rotten, just dead). In my experience with A.melanops, their larvae just won't pupate without this wood chunk, but apparently other Alaus will settle on top of their substrate and pupate there after a while. Adults just eat fresh fruits, and would probably accept beetle jellies too. Obviously larvae need to be separated from a young age, as they are predatory and quite cannibalistic...
  19. Goliathus

    Chrysina beyeri

    A Purple-legged Jewel Scarab (Chrysina beyeri) (captive reared) that just emerged today. Some coleopterists are of the opinion that it's the most beautiful of the US Chrysina spp.
  20. davehuth

    Lucanus placidus Say, 1825 - Male

    Those are actually good tips for if I ever find a late season female. Here in NY our Lucanus is capreolus. I've never seen one. Hopefully my inspiration from beetleforum to assemble a light trap will attract some. I'm sure I will be asking the braintrust here for advice if I do :-)
  21. JKim

    Lucanus placidus Say, 1825 - Male

    @davehuth Yes, the female I collected last year was already gravid. Of course, there is no way telling whether it is mated female or not, but I just dump her into a setup and found couple eggs / larvae afterward. The reason I set her up was that (1) I collected a specimen in late May (2018) and since this species seems to be out in late April to early May, I assumed it has already mated by the time and (2) the specimen was not in a good condition (some scuffs/scratches entirely), meaning it has been some time since it has emerged. But... this is just "a guess," and proven to be correct that is has mated previously.
  22. Goliathus

    Buddleia davidii

    I think the Chrysobothris might be C. femorata. I planted a lot of Anethum (dill) and Petroselinum (parsley) this year as food plants for Papilio polyxenes (Black swallowtail).
  23. davehuth

    Buddleia davidii

    Those little scarabs look really cool. Are the Chrysobothris you’re seeing the metallic ones? Here in NY we,re still about a week away from the first spring blooms to atttract many pollinators apart from bees. I’ve cultivated a sizable patch of wild mustard that looks like it’s getting ready to pop. That’s typically when I start seeing the first butterflies.
  24. Goliathus

    Buddleia davidii

    They're already attracting butterflies more strongly than anything else I've seen - especially many Nymphalidae, such as Vanessa atalanta. Monarchs and swallowtails, too. Also - various click beetles, the flower scarab Euphoria sepulcralis, and was surprised to see a buprestid of the genus Chrysobothris (which I wasn't aware came to flowers).
  25. davehuth

    Lucanus placidus Say, 1825 - Male

    It’s pretty cool that you found one with your name tattooed on its elytra! 😆 just kidding. I’m curious: If you hadn’t collected a male previously, where did you get the 10 larvae? Were the females you found gravid? Or did you purchase them online?
  26. davehuth

    Buddleia davidii

    Dang those are great. Do you expect them to bring in some nice flower beetles and swallowtails?
  27. I collected a 30mm male of Lucanus placidus Say, 1825 couple days ago. I found couple females in the past, but this is my first male. It seems they can be found in more areas than any other Lucanus spp in the US, but rarely collected in southern states. I haven't seen much images of captive bred specimens.. Could it be because it is rarely encountered? They are not a difficult species to rear at all. I currently have 10 larvae doing very well, and likely to emerge this summer.
  28. Goliathus

    Buddleia davidii

    Several new (new to me, at least) cultivars of Buddleia davidii that I've started working with this year - a standard-sized pale blue, standard-sized fuchsia, and a dwarf amethyst variety.
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