Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Yesterday
  2. darktheumbreon

    Sales of A.dichotoma in the US?

    I'd imagine you have a strong connection to beetle breeders in Japan, but do you happen to know people who breed them in Europe? It seems like flower beetles are much more popular in Europe, but I have never seen anyone post about those species in the international pages. I wish you great luck, thank you for your great contribution so far to the hobby!
  3. Beetle-Experience

    Sales of A.dichotoma in the US?

    I am/was hoping to find more literature and breeding reports on things like Argyrophegges, Fornasinius and Hegemus to try to help my case for also allowing these species in the U.S. I have talked to a few breeders but need more concrete evidence. I have also been searching for a reputable source for some of the South American Scarabaeinae.. there is a whole bunch of interesting species like Phanaeus lancifer ! Most of the people I have found deal in heavily in Lepidoptera.
  4. Hisserdude

    Sales of A.dichotoma in the US?

    Anthia have been bred successfully by @wizentrop, as seen in this thread. It's challenging, and larval output is naturally quite low, but if enough effort were put in one could theoretically establish a colony in captivity over several years. Mantichora have not been successfully bred as far as I know, tiger beetles in general are quite picky in captivity, and I hear the bottleneck with Mantichora is getting larvae to pupate, they probably need some sort of seasonal cues to do so.
  5. Last week
  6. Goliathus

    Sales of A.dichotoma in the US?

    Beetle-Experience wrote: Some of the exotic coleopteral exceptions include: Scarabaeinae (Dung Beetles, as long as they are not from a country with a history of "Hand, foot, and mouth disease") And this exception would presumably include the giant metallic South American species such as the blue Phanaeus lancifer and green P. ensifer (which, although they are true dung beetles of the tribe Phanaeini, are actually carrion scavengers)? insectivorous beetles like Carabidae (Ground Beetles, Tiger Beetles) Including large African genera such as Mantichora and Anthia? I've seen both of these in zoos and museums a couple of times (many years ago), though I've not heard of any successful captive breeding of either of them. and the three aforementioned species of Goliathus. I assume that at least part of the reason why Goliathus was de-regulated in the US is because, almost uniquely among cetoniine scarabs, the larvae of this genus are carnivorous rather than herbivorous? Certainly, all that I have ever read about captive breeding efforts with these beetles clearly indicates that they simply cannot survive without a specialized, very high protein diet. Without this, the larvae fail to develop. While they will readily accept protein-rich food pellets in captivity, it is strongly suspected (because of dietary requirements, behavior, and certain morphological characteristics) that in nature, the larvae of Goliathus feed primarily on the larvae of other beetles - quite possibly those of Melolonthinae ("June" beetles), or of smaller Cetoniinae (e.g. - Eudicella, Stephanorrhina, Pachnoda). Incidentally, Goliathus is not completely unique in being a predatory cetoniine - captive breeding has shown that the larvae of its closest relatives, Argyrophegges, Fornasinius and Hegemus (all of which are also Afrotropical) also have such dietary requirements (although, as is the case with Goliathus, exactly what they prey on in the wild is not currently known). An interesting taxonomic paper on Fornasinius was recently published - LINK. I note that many European coleopterists commonly refer to Fornasinius (and related genera within the subtribe Goliathina) as "Goliath beetles"; I myself consider only the genus Goliathus to be true Goliath beetles, but that's just my preference. I've also sometimes heard Strategus, Dynastes, and various other Dynastinae (Rhino beetles) referred to as "Elephant beetles", but I only call Rhino beetles Elephant beetles if they're actually in the genus Megasoma. In the US, there is at least one genus of cetoniine scarabs that are known to be carnivorous rather than herbivorous - Cremastocheilus. They are associated with ant nests, and adults are known to feed on ant larvae. It seems that the larvae of Cremastocheilus may also feed on ant larvae / pupae. Possibly, these beetles produce an odor that causes the ants to not recognize them as strangers within their colonies. I've only ever encountered one specimen of this unusual genus (in Arizona), but they are many species found across the US, and they are not uncommon. Each Cremastocheilus species is specialized to a particular host species of ant. Actually JKim, one Scarabaeidae that much of the U.S. is having trouble with is Popillia japonica - "Japanese Beetles", they have not made it to Louisiana yet. P. japonica has been in the US for over 100 years now. Clearly, there is some environmental factor that prevents it from extending its range beyond the eastern third of the country. It seems that this species has never been able to spread very far west of the Mississippi River. It may be that as you go toward the Great Plains, the decreased amount of rainfall simply isn't adequate for them, or the summers are too hot and dry.
  7. Thank you! Speaking of Scarite beetles, my niece just found a huge one! An inch long. It could be a Warrior Beetle. However, this beetle is having a problem. He constantly falls over on his back and can't get up. My niece said she found him that way. Probably an older specimen or sick. He's in a seperate container. I'll keep my eye on him. EDIT: I released him, as I kept seeing him fall on his back. I hope the best for him. He crawled away fine under my deck.
  8. The Scarite Ground Beetle species is Scarites subterraneus.
  9. Hisserdude

    Beetle Problem

    Haha well hopefully @Lucanus will have some available in the future if he breeds his adults.
  10. Goliathus

    What Beetle is this?

    It's in the family Chrysomelidae, but I'm not familiar with what species this is.
  11. JAC

    What Beetle is this?

    I found this little guy near a local bayou. I tried to identify it through various sites but to no avail. It's very small (around .5 inches) and found in South Texas if that helps.
  12. Garin

    Rosenbergia xenium

    Wow, awesome looking beetle. The photography is fantastic! Captures every detail! I can only dream.
  13. Garin

    Collecting trip tips

    WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Those are amazing photos!
  14. Goliathus

    Rosenbergia xenium

    I'm a bit too far east for Trachyderes (=Dendrobius) mandibularis, though I saw a couple of them in AZ years ago. Yes, it's a very unusual looking longhorn; very glossy - they look like they're made of colored glass! Another great longhorn is Sphingnotus mirabilis, from New Guinea - When a species has the name "mirabilis" (amazing, wondrous, remarkable), you know it must be something special!
  15. Beetle-Experience

    Collecting trip tips

    Maybe send me a message or email (info@beetle-experience.com). Are you keeping things alive or is everything being preserved? In central and northern LA we have scorpions, tarantulas, centipedes, leaf-cutter ants, large beetles... The large aquatics in south LA: Giant Water Bugs: Lethocerus uhleri and Benacus griseus Predaceous Diving Beetles: Cybister fimbriolatus Giant Water Scavenger Beetles: Hydrophilus triangularis ..plus: Eastern Lubber Grasshoppers Steven
  16. Bugoodle

    Beetle Problem

    Edit: Whoops! Sorry Hisser Dude! For some reason I got you confused with Lucanus. Up ttoo late, time to take my sleeping pill. I mean, still, if you or anyone else happen to own these, hit me up. lol
  17. Me and my niece had a break today though, tonight we found a lot of large Rice Beetles. Now I have 5 of them, but only one male - and he is making grubs with the females. How long is a beetle's/scarab's gravid period before laying eggs?
  18. I don't think they play dead, they actually look intimidating when frightened. They tuck their legs, and lift their head up with opened mandibles. I wish I knew what type of millipede I caught. We actually have 2, (my niece found one) but not much can be found on millipedes in Virginia besides Apheloria virginiensis and they don't make good pets(they won't eat or anything and just die). I wonder if what I have is a young Narceus americanus .
  19. Sorry I confused the two, now I remember. Don't the Scarite Ground Beetles play dead or am I thinking of another beetle that looks similar? Also very nice millipede.
  20. Hisserdude

    Beetle Problem

    Nope, triceratops beetles, Phileurus truncatus. Think they're rather long lived for a Dynastid, I forget exactly how long though.
  21. American Carrion Beetles arent endangered, but they can be hard to spot as they spend their time on rotten flesh. I found this one on a small piece of poop, and I accidently touched it. Ugh. Here's the Scarite Ground Beetles: The Carrion Beetle: And the unknown millipede. He's probably close to 2 inches or less. He doesn't stop moving so I can't measure him:
  22. It's the American Burying Beetle (Nicrophorus americanus) that's endangered, not the American Carrion Beetle (Necrophila americana).
  23. That really sucks, sometime you just get nothing. You do know the American Carrion Beetle is Endangered right?
  24. UGH! 😡 Worst bug hunt ever! I always find bess beetles there! I only found 2 large DEAD ones. Not even worth keeping, as their heads were missing! I was and still pissed off! But I will return there one day and look inside the logs, not just under. 😤 However, I did catch an American Carrion Beetle and some kind of millipede. When my camera charges(which takes forever), I'll take pictures. I also have 2 nice sized female rice beetles, a mating pair of scarites ground beetle(not sure what species they are, they are small)
  25. JunkaiWangisme

    Collecting trip tips

    I am planning 2 days there. Do you know of any specific spots I will be allowed to light trap? Also, what aquatics are there? I am planning to spend a night in a national forest there, are there anything good in those areas?
  26. JunkaiWangisme

    Collecting trip tips

    The entire thing, I have to pass it to get to the more southern states, as I live in Michigan
  27. JunkaiWangisme

    Collecting trip tips

    I will see if I can swing by there. Do they allow camping and light trapping?
  1. Load more activity
×