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  1. Yesterday
  2. Beetle-Experience

    Goliath beetles

    Bugboy3092: Yes, they will be. I've only had one male so far Goliathus: Yes: I have a few, small ventilation holes in each container, some on the lid and some on the sides. The cocoon is normally buried, but some of the times they dig it up with them when they are emerging.
  3. Last week
  4. Takoto

    State of the Hobby(TM)

    I found beetleforum through another forum I was checking out a while ago - I'm not sure how many people nearby me are big on beetles, but there's a petshop nearby which occasionally has some of the bigger, more popular beetle adults in stock, so assumably there's at least one person nearby who is! I became interested in beetles through the video game Animal Crossing, where you can catch bugs and donate to the in-game museum, sell them, or keep them as pets (though sadly they can't be interacted with). I got interested in looking up the beetles featured in the game, many years ago, and ended up becoming super interested - but I've always been interested in invertebrates in general, so I feel like it was only a matter of time.
  5. Goliathus

    Goliath beetles

    I assume that the container with the cocoon must be ventilated somehow? I can't tell from the photo, but undoubtedly, there are some ventilation holes? Is the cocoon normally kept on the substrate surface like that, throughout the pupation process?
  6. Bugboy3092

    Goliath beetles

    Gorgeous! Will any of these guys be for sale?
  7. Beetle-Experience

    Goliath beetles

  8. Beetle-Experience

    Goliath beetles

  9. Beetle-Experience

    Goliath beetles

    The first adults of my current Goliath beetle generation have started emerging..
  10. Dak.the.bug

    Beetles in Maine

    Thank you for your response, Bugboy, it looks like I have some reading to do. I had originally received my information off Insectidentification.net and when I saw that L.elaphus was supposedly in Maine, I kind of ended up hoping that that website had known better than the others that said L.elaphus was not in Maine, denial is a cruel mistress I suppose. I would love to try and make some sort of journey for collecting bugs next summer, Maine doesn't really have that many interesting bug species, but they probably aren't interesting to me because I live here.
  11. Bugboy3092

    Beetles in Maine

    If you’re looking for area data, check inaturalist, as that seems to be a good check. Otherwise I would avoid looking online, as many websites have false or unpacked data on the ranges of insects, although bugguide.net might be more accurate (I would definitely avoid Wikipedia, insectidentification.net (I’m pretty sure that vinegaroons don’t live in Georgia lol) and any non-entomologist-run websites (including blogs, info pages, etc). The book of beetles (Patrice Bouchard) appears to state the the species doesn’t range further than New York (in the book the states aren’t labeled, and continents are the only regional boundaries), beetles of eastern North America (Arthur v evans) (almost certainly the most reliable book for finding ranges on eastern beetle species of any kind) states them only ranging north to Pennsylvania. I’ve never seen any sources state they range further north, so it seems quite likely that the answer is no, they don’t live in Maine, or near it sadly. Now if you ever happen to be in Georgia, they’re plague here, and I’ve never even seen a capreolus in the state.
  12. Carlc1

    Composter

    Newegg.com is the only place I know of in the states that sells it. Carl
  13. Garin

    Composter

    Thanks for sharing Carl, where did you buy it?
  14. Carlc1

    Composter

    Bringing this post back alive. I have a Earth Systems composter and it is worth every cent. I’m making flake soil that my tityus love. Time needed is 5-7 days and a week or so resting out of the machine. For the resting period I move the soil to a trash can with vents cut into the lid. I mix it with a paint mixer and drill every day or every other day. Maximum loading of the machine produces right around 5 gallons of soil. I’ve only done single passes with the soil for now. I like it so much I recently bought a second one that will be here in a couple of days. Once the second one arrives I’ll try multiple sessions to create different degrees of breakdown. I haven’t tried leaves yet as I have a stable supply of naturally broken down leaves but I might try a batch to see how it does. I’m also thinking about making some kinshi from single pass soil to see if i can speed up that process. I use matured kinshi as white wood. No more buying flake soil that is cut with compost or soil. Single pass soil is also working well for isopod and millipede substrate. Carl
  15. Dak.the.bug

    Beetles in Maine

    Oh wow. I will check to see if the other states have them. Thank you very much for responding, I really appreciate and value any response I can get.
  16. Pewrune

    Beetles in Maine

    I would check all the near by states(New Hampshire/Vermont etc), if all of them have elaphus then there's a high chance. My personal guess is no though. it seems too far away from their most populated location. Lucanus species are not foodies. They don't eat much compared to Dorcus and Odontalabis ...etc. However, they seems to fly to lights more than many other stags. Btw, from my observation, L. elaphus comes out in bulk for 3 weeks within a year, 1st week males, the later 2 weeks females. Took me 4 years to figure this out. If you missed it, you will have to wait for another year. I drove 5000+ miles just to observe elaphus this year.
  17. Dak.the.bug

    Beetles in Maine

    Alright everyone. I was wondering if you guys could help me out here. I have been told by several sources that there are Lucanus Elaphus in Maine, but they are very rare. I know I have found stags as a kid, but they weren't very big, nor were they all that impressive looking. I have been finding conflicting information about whether or not L.elaphus are here or not. One website says yes while others say no, the general consensus seems to be no, so I just want to know because I based a project on trying to attract stags in Maine with different baits and might need to rethink my project despite already putting my foot in my mouth and saying "My project is to find stag beetles by luring them in with bait."
  18. Earlier
  19. Bugboy3092

    Finding beetles

    Specifically, live hardwood trees that have rotted out insides, oftentimes if there are dynastes inside you’ll see frass pellets in the wood, which is a giveaway that grubs are there. Be careful though, spiders, ants, and other creatures hide in the cool, moist insides and may defend themselves if bothered.
  20. Bugboy3092

    Lucanus elaphus hibernation

    It’ll probably work, and yes they also require a hibernation period
  21. Bugboy3092

    ID help - Dermestid?

    You’re lucky, those look like pleasing fungus beetle (erotylidae) pupae!
  22. davehuth

    ID help - Dermestid?

    Hello! These are clustered under a rotting pine log in my front yard, Allegany County, NY (USA). Are they pupating dermestid beetles? Thanks for any help :-)
  23. I am in agreement with all of these comments. Yes, it's quite possible that granti and tityus diverged considerably less than 2 mya. They might not have appeared as distinct "species" until sometime well into the Pleistocene, possibly even the latter part of the epoch.
  24. An interesting read in this regard is Jen-Pan Huang's "The great American biotic interchange and diversification history in Dynastes beetles" in the Sep 1 2016 issue of the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, wherein, among other strong assertions, granti and tityus are absolutely classed as separate and distinct species. What's the point of all this? I contend: 1. The 2 million year figure for granti/tityus bifurcation may well be accurate but could also be off by an order of magnitude or more. 2. Although taxonomy has come a long way in the last few centuries, a precise understanding of species and speciation remains frustratingly elusive. 3. Ultimately, Stellar's queries re hybrid viability can only be addressed via experiment.
  25. At the genus level, there won't be very much genetic difference between two species, even if their physical characteristics are quite different. D. granti and D. tityus are very closely related, and by some classifications, they may simply be viewed as geographical races of the same species. They possibly diverged from a common ancestor when increased aridity in the southwest geographically separated the AZ / NM mountains from the wetter environments of the east.
  26. Well, when querying www.timetree.org to determine the phylogenetic distance between Dynastes granti and Dynastes tityus, I get an error message telling me the two taxa are the same. Guess this means I have to power up my trusty time machine again, carefully setting the dial for 2,000,000 years...
  27. I believe that the "2 million years" quote is based upon research on a variety of species, (esp. mammals) though it might not necessarily apply to all animal groups (inc. insects), and probably not to plants at all. Of course, through genetic engineering, it's possible to mix genes from species separated by hundreds of millions of years (e.g. cats and jellyfish). Undoubtedly, we'll be seeing a LOT more of this in the years to come.
  28. How is this figure determined for particular species?
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