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  1. Yesterday
  2. Dak.the.bug

    Bug collecting.

    I just wanted to take a moment and thank everyone for their input, it is greatly appreciated.
  3. GelGelada

    Eastern Hercules size concerns...

    Yep, I already got a bag of that. They get a mix of fermented stuff with wood and Miracle-Gro for filler and they eat it up. Sorry about the photo, it's all I had that was recent without digging them up again to take more, I was in a hurry with something else and I was reminded of the grub's size and wanted to make a post while it was fresh in my mind.
  4. Last week
  5. Females are tend to be smaller, but not sure if that actually is a female from the picture provided. D. tityus can take an year plus to three years to actually emerge to adult beetles. Each specimen, disregarding whether it is male or female, can take an year plus to three years or more to become adults. If there is any local garden and hardware stores available as well as Walmart, Lowe's, or Home Depot, then try find an organic potting mix. It is good alternative for a fermented oak substrate. Make sure your potting mix does not have any small centipedes earthworms, as it sometimes have in winter and colder seasons. I reared more than just couple D. tityus for several years now okay even with the organic potting mix (soil) commercially available from stores. There were three particular brands I used in past, but I can't remember any but one, which was Miracle-Gro. Its design has changed a lot, but try look for ones with vegetable images and orange colored bag. If not available in such look, just buy something that says "organic potting mix."
  6. JKim

    Carnivorous Plants

    Just in case, if you are getting carnivorous plants to remove any small flies including fruit flies and mushroom flies around your beetle containers, that is NOT a great idea. Carnivorous plants are commonly known to feed on insects and small animals for nutrition, however, that is so wrong... Their regular diet is nutrition from soil and photosynthesis from sunlight. As the name says, they can digest insects or small animals (rat sometimes do fall into the nepenthese), however, they actually use up similar amount of energy to digest to consume. Therefore, if the plant is fed up with too many insects daily basis, they can die off from it (which is kind of funny for the name). I used to harvest some venus fly trap variations, but lost my interest after an year as I couldn't find the good forum to discuss or buy more things... It was way before the Facebook gotten popular to people. I'm pretty sure there is a group in Facebook as well.
  7. GelGelada

    Eastern Hercules size concerns...

    Aaaah okay. I thought it was smaller because she's female, but that also makes sense. Some of my ox beetles are lagging in the same way, but they also hatched later. I think my hercules were all from the same batch, as I think I got Peter's last three listed on the website and they were fairly large when I got them. My ox beetles were from eggs from last year. I wish there was some safe way to keep them warm, but I'm afraid to use lamps constantly in this house. It was very warm here for a while and then suddenly it got below freezing and has stayed that way for a week. The huge temp fluctuations we've had since last year have got me worried that it's messed with them somehow.
  8. arizonablue

    Eastern Hercules size concerns...

    Glad to help. Even with the same conditions, some grubs just lag behind a bit. If they're cold, that will slow them down as well. You can tell she's a molt behind the other one - her head capsule is much smaller compared to the larger grub.
  9. GelGelada

    Eastern Hercules size concerns...

    Okay, I was a little worried given that they're all on the same batch of food mix and it's been very cold. I'll probably get a bag from Peter soon just to be sure... Thank you! Others are free to weigh in more though.
  10. arizonablue

    Eastern Hercules size concerns...

    Your little lady isn't necessarily small, she's just a molt behind. She's just taking her time. Both grubs are full of food so you're doing great. Peter has oak sub in stock on Bugs In Cyberspace if you're worried about their food situation.
  11. Goliathus

    Chrysina beyeri & gloriosa

    Some photos of my Chrysina beyeri and C. gloriosa - two of the four species in this genus that are found in the US. The other two are woodi and lecontei.
  12. Is it normal for female larva to be quite small? One of my larva from a trio I bought in October appears to be half the size of my other two grubs. I know females are smaller, but I worry. Forgive me as this is my first time raising Eastern Hercules. I tried offering the smallest one dry dog food, but even after a whole month, they haven't touched it so I removed it because I was concerned about the mold sapping all the nutrients from the substrate. Would it be a good idea to put them into plain compost with wood chunks? Right now they're all in a mix of things with leaves and wood in compost, but I don't know if they would benefit from oak leaves at all. Edit: I know fermented oak is best but I'm out of that for the moment. I was fermenting oak pellets/dust for them but now it's gotten too cold to continue with that, hence the plain compost situation until it warms up again and it's not freezing my bucket. I'm not sure if it would ferment indoors or how bad the smell would be... so input on an indoor bucket would be nice.
  13. Have ordered this book from the US on Amazon. It was cheaper than buying a second hand copy on Amazon UK.
  14. Hi there, I’m Matt, from Gloucestershire in the UK. I have been rearing moths/butterflies for a few years and now fancy dipping my toe into the world of beetles. I have a young son who I hope to interest in invertabrates generally as he’ll have plenty of people pushing the vertabrate agenda in his life! Cheers, Matt
  15. Earlier
  16. JKim

    Bug collecting.

    Dynastine scarabs are basically everywhere in the United States depending on the species. Dynastes grantii occur in Arizona abundantly, and rarely found in adjacent states. They fly around starting May-June to September to October, however the peak flight season is late August to early September. Its sister species, the D. tityus can be found from eastern Texas west to Georgia north to somewhere near New York. I know there are records in lots of counties in Philadelphia. Try go to Philadelphia in sometime June to July as it is closer than southern states from your location, Maine. Strategus are here and there. Strategus aloeus is considered very common species in Louisiana, and its peak season for adults is from late June to early July in Louisiana. Its sister species, S. antaeus, that is less common can be found from last week of May to first week of June in Louisiana. Somewhere in North or South Carolina has records of Dorcus parallelus as well. It is very small Lucanid beetle, however, is one of the Dorcus species. Lucanus elaphus should be available in Virginia and around. Refer to Bugguide and/or iNaturalist records to see when and where the records been made in your area or nearer area to your state.
  17. JKim

    Plant collecting

    I don't bring in the dead oak tree from forest to make it a substrate. I use wood pellets commercially available for barbecue grilling. It is natural without any chemical substance mixed up in it. It is completely safe and and a lot easier to handle. In case of leaves, I have oak trees in my backyard. I just cut down a huge one because it was too close to a building.
  18. CactusKing

    BDFB Larva starting to Pupate

    Oh I have raised mealworms before. I mean like the first "rare" kind of beetle ya know? Still in a pupal chamber as a pre-pupa sadly. But not dead!
  19. The Mantis Menagerie

    Plant collecting

    Still, I don't have much room to stuff 18-gallon totes.
  20. PowerHobo

    Plant collecting

    It's honestly not as much as it sounds like! It's just four 18-gallon totes. I keep them in the garage since it's nice and cold in the winter to discourage further decomposition.
  21. The Mantis Menagerie

    Bug collecting.

    Wow! Okay, I have never found that many.
  22. Bugboy3092

    Bug collecting.

    Haha, maybe it’s the down south triad, once I found nearly 100 lucanus elaphus grubs in one place (yes I’m sure on their id and no I didn’t take them all)
  23. Bugboy3092

    Plant collecting

    Haha yes, I personally try to stock up right before fall, right when the leaves are oldest and moldiest (the fungus is what’s decaying the leaves) and for the most part that’s my winter supply. If you dig a lit,e you can still find the moldy layer under the fresh leaves, but some of it will have died off and there may be fresh ones mixed in
  24. The Mantis Menagerie

    Bug collecting.

    Not so fast! All I can seem to find in NC are Lucanus elephas. They are everywhere (at least when compared to other large species).
  25. Bugboy3092

    Bug collecting.

    Considering where you live, Georgia is probably your best chance at a good amount of large beetles. South Carolina is good too, but Georgia is probably the best state for lucanus elaphus (they’re plague here)
  26. The Mantis Menagerie

    Plant collecting

    I am not sure where I would store that much substrate! My yard is covered in oak leaves. I just gathered a big bag of them today before they get wet and moldy.
  27. PowerHobo

    Plant collecting

    You can be overstocked on flake soil? 😂 I fermented 120lbs this past summer, and I'm down to my last 5-10lbs, worrying about larvae making it until my next batch is ready. lol Unfortunately, finding an oak tree in Vegas isn't a common occurrence, so I'm pretty much a slave to purchasing leaves. I think collecting like a madman is a good idea, personally.
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